Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Scenario:

platform: ASP.NET 4.0, MVC 2.0 (doesn't have to be MVC if it's not the right solution)

Create various widgets that inherit the same core markup:

<div class="widget">
    <div class="hd-widget">
        <!-- dynamically inject code here for each actual widget -->

    </div>
    <div class="bd-widget">
        <!-- dynamically inject code here for each actual widget -->
    </div>
    <div class="ft-widget">
        <!-- dynamically inject code here for each actual widget -->
    </div>
</div>

The above "simplified" example should be in some reusable control or masterpage.

The flow is something like this:

Controller -> View -> Partial View (1..n) -> widget markup

User instantiates an action which calls a controller. The controller tries to render a view that contains content + multiple widgets (left rail, right rail, etc). The Widgets all have their own individual partial views but each partial view should inherit or consume a base set of widget markup and have controller areas where to embed functionality.

Functionality in the head, body, and footer can either be plain text, HTML, or additional custom controls.

What is the best recommended approach?

share|improve this question
    
Are you thinking of something like MasterPages, but for partial views? –  Larsenal Oct 4 '10 at 21:44
1  
Yes, there were some older posts for doing just that, but in MVC 2.0 / ASP.NET 4.0 it does not allow you to use a MasterPage as a partial HTML layout. –  nopuck4you Oct 4 '10 at 22:22
    
Looks like the post I referenced using MasterPages works but generates warning messages in VS 2010 about it being invalid markup for a MasterPage. Regardless, it works like a charm to create standard module markup with embeddable content in various placeholder regions. –  nopuck4you Oct 13 '10 at 19:55

2 Answers 2

I would be thinking you would have a WidgetModel which contains a set of properties regarding the widget.

Eg.

public class WidgetModel
{
   public string ControllerName { get; set; }
   public string HeaderAction { get; set; }
   public string BodyAction { get; set; }
   public string FooterAction { get; set; }
}

And you have a Widget View like

<div class="widget">
   <div class="hd-widget">
      <%: Html.RenderAction(Model.HeaderAction, Model.ControllerName) %>
   </div>
   <div class="bd-widget">
      <%: Html.RenderAction(Model.BodyAction, Model.ControllerName) %>
   </div>
   <div class="ft-widget">
      <%: Html.RenderAction(Model.FooterAction, Model.ControllerName) %>
   </div>
</div>

Of course you could add more to it if you wanted.

share|improve this answer

I assume that your widgets will be stored in a DB.

I guess you'll need tables for Paths, PageSettings, Widgets, WidgetInstances, MasterPages, MasterPageZones and Zones.

I think that each widget will need to make a call in to RenderAction and this action will be stored in the DB against the widget. The widget header and footer can probably just be retrieved from the DB.

When I did this I spent quite a bit of time creating the dynamic editor for each of the widgets, the state of each widget is serialized in json, the only issue I'm still working on is dynamic validation of the widget editor.

Page Layouts are handled by a custom personalization class, storing the masterpage, path, userId etc.

It's quite an involved solution using JQuery sortable but really quick and SEO friendly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.