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When I type .ToString() on an Enum type in Visual Studio, the Intellisense shows a "strike-through" line through ToString() (although it builds and works fine). It seems to indicate that Enum.ToString() is deprecated in some way. Is this true? If so, why?

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It's because ToString() is not needed, as that's whats going to be called anyway – PostMan Oct 4 '10 at 22:10
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Are you using any extensions for VS that add coloring (such as the strike out)? – Reed Copsey Oct 4 '10 at 22:14
    
@Reed, I am using ReSharper... don't know if that is doing it – JoelFan Oct 4 '10 at 22:18
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It's ReSharper. Congratulations-- you've found a bug/feature. – dtb Oct 4 '10 at 22:19
    
@dtb: Want to add that to your answer, for future reference? – Michael Petrotta Oct 4 '10 at 22:25
up vote 25 down vote accepted

The Enum.ToString overloads that take an IFormatProvider, ToString(IFormatProvider) and ToString(String, IFormatProvider), are both obsolete, because the IFormatProvider isn't used anyway.

The other overloads, ToString() and ToString(String), are not obsolete.

It's a feature of ReSharper to strike out obsolete class members. It's apparently not very good at it.

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Specifically, the no-arg overload (ToString()) that the OP is using is not deprecated. – Michael Petrotta Oct 4 '10 at 22:11
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Well, Intellisense strikes out "ToString" even before I expand the overloads – JoelFan Oct 4 '10 at 22:11
    
@Joel: what do you mean by "strikes out"? Do you get a compiler error or warning? What do you see when you mouse over that code? – Michael Petrotta Oct 4 '10 at 22:12
    
These guys have a similar experience: channel9.msdn.com/forums/Coffeehouse/… – Richard Cook Oct 4 '10 at 22:12
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Visual Studio doesn't strike through anything by default. I remember Resharper doing such things though. – dtb Oct 4 '10 at 22:15

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