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I am working on a silverlight application and I am using RIA data services and nHibernate.

Currently, I have an entity with a one to many relationship to another entity.

public class Employer {
    [Key]
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Person {
    [Key]
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    [Include]
    [Association("PersonCurrentEmployer", "CurrentEmployerId", "Id", IsForeignKey = true)]
    public virtual Employer CurrentEmployer { get; set; }
    public virtual int? CurrentEmployerId { get; set; }
}

The property CurrentEmployerId is set for no insert and no update in the mappings.

On the Silverlight side, I set the CurrentEmployer property of the person to an existing employer on the client side submit the changes.

personEntity.CurrentEmployer = megaEmployer;
dataContext.SubmitChanges();

On the server side, the person entity's CurrentEmployerId is set to megaEmployer.Id but the CurrentEmployer is null. Because I am using the CurrentEmployer property and not the CurrentEmployerId to save the relationship, the relationship isn't changed.

Is there a way to force RIA to send the CurrentEmployer object with the save or do I have to use the CurrentEmployerId on the server side to load the employer and set it to the CurrentEmployer?

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Yes, I have the same problem here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4921465/… It's seems that NHibernate still doesn't have enought support I suppose; we should operate ForeighKey, not the entities! scip.be/index.php?Page=ArticlesNET30&Lang=NL That's a shame, I think Microsoft Team should listen to us =) –  EvgeniyK Feb 8 '11 at 6:50

3 Answers 3

The reason you're not seeing your CurrentEmployer on the client side is because you don't have your association setup correctly.

RIA services doesn't work with references in the usual way so referencing your Employer on the client side doesnt work. RIA services works with entity sets and creates the "references" based on the association attributes. Your employer needs a property with an association back to the Person as follows.

    public class Employer 
    {
        private Person person;

        [Key]
        public virtual int Id { get; set; }
        public virtual string Name { get; set; }
        public virtual int PersonID { get; set; }

        [Include]
        [Association("PersonCurrentEmployer", "PersonID", "Id", IsForeignKey = false)]
        public virtual Person Person    {
            get
            {
                return this.person;
            }

            set
            {
                this.person = value;
                if (value != null)
                {
                    this.PersonID = value.Id;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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Is there a way to force RIA to send the CurrentEmployer object with the save or do I have to use the CurrentEmployerId on the server side to load the employer and set it to the CurrentEmployer?

I'm running into this problem as well. Basically, you either have to use the [Composition] attribute (which I wouldnt' recommend), or load the entity from the database, server-side. Composition muddies up the client data model and doesn't take care of all cases you need to worry about. (there is a lot more on Composition in the RIA forums.silverlight.net)

[UPDATE] Once you implement 2nd level cache, the worry of reading supporting entities from the database mostly goes away, as they will be loaded from cache. Also, if you only need a proxy for NHibernate to not complain, then look into Get/Load (can never remember which) .. which will return an NH proxy and will result in a single-column-and-entity select from the database. (If you try to access another property of the proxy, NH will select the rest. you can find more on this on Ayende's blog..)[/UPDATE]

The biggest problem I'm having is getting NHib to actually save and load the relationship. (I'm also using Fluent). The response from the responsible parties has so far been "waah, you can't do that. it looks like RIA wasn't developed with NHib in mind" .. which is a crap answer, IMHO. Instead of helping me figure out how to map it, they're telling me i'm doing it wrong for having a ForeignKey in my entity (NHib shouldn't care that i have my FK in my entity) ...

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I want to share what I did to make this work, because 'official' support for this scenario was ... let's just say unhelpful at best, and downright rude at worst.

Incidentally, you had the same idea I had: making the Foreign Key not insert/update. BUT, I've also made it Generated.Always(). this way it will always read the value back.

Additionally, I override DomainService.Submit() and DomainService.ExecuteChangeSet(). I start an NHibernate Transaction in the Submit (though I'm not yet sure this does what I expect it does).

Instead of putting my save logic in the InsertSomeEntity() or UpdateSomeEntity() methods, I'm doing it all inside ExecuteChangeSet. this is because of NHibernate, and its NEED to have the entity graph fully-bi-directional and hydrated out prior to performing actions in NHibernate. This includes loading of entities from the database or session when a child item comes across the wire from RIA services. (I started down the path of writing methods to get the various other pieces of the graph as those specialized methods needed them, but I found it easier to do it all in a single method. Moreover, I was running into the problem of RIA wanting me to perform the insert/updates against the child objects first, which for new items is a problem.)

I want to make a comment about the composition attribute. I still stand by my previous comment about not recommending it for standard child entity collections, HOWEVER, it works GREAT for supporting NHibernate Components, because otherwise RIA will never send back the parent instance (of the composition), which is required for NHibernate to work right.

I didn't provide any code here because i would have to do some heavy redacting, but it's not a problem for me to do if you would like to see it.

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