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How can I get the pid of my make command in the Makefile?

Specifically, I want to use a temp directory that will be unique to this build.

I tried:

TEMPDIR = /tmp/myprog.$$$$

but this seems to store TEMPDIR as "/tmp/myprog.$$" and then eval as a new pid for every command which refs this! How do I get one pid for all of them (I'd prefer the make pid, but anything unique will do).

Thanks, -Shawn

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Original question: How to get process id in Makefile. If anyone knows, I'd love an answer. However, this solved the root problem I had. –  sligocki Nov 9 '11 at 21:32
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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Try mktemp for creating unique temporary filenames. The -d option will create a directory instead of a file.

TEMPDIR := $(shell mktemp)

Note the colon. (Editor's note: This causes make to evaluate the function once and assign its value instead of re-evaluating the expression for every reference to $(TEMPDIR).)

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Thanks, this looks like a good alternative. I'm rather new to Makefile syntax, how can I define a variable (TEMPDIR) using a shell command (mktemp)? –  sligocki Oct 5 '10 at 0:55
2  
TEMPDIR := $(shell mktemp). Note the colon. –  Matthew Iselin Oct 5 '10 at 1:04
    
This does not answer the question. –  badzil Sep 30 '11 at 20:22
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I don't know why I can't add a comment to the Answer

TEMPDIR := $(shell mktemp)

The problem is: every time you run make, it will create a temporary file. Regardless of you use it or not and regardless of the make target you use. That means: either you delete this file in every target or you they will not be deleted anytime.

I prefer to add the -u parameter:

TEMPDIR := $(shell mktemp -u)

This makes mktemp to create an unique filename without creating the file. Now you can create the file in the targets you need them. Of course there is a chance of a race conditions, whre file is used by another process before you create it. But that is very unlikely.

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make starts a new shell for each command it starts. Using bash (didn't check for other shells) echo $PPID gives the parent process ID (which is make).

all: subtarget 
        echo $$PPID
        echo $(shell echo $$PPID)

subtarget:
        echo $$PPID
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You could use a date string. Unless you're kicking off multiple builds at the same time this should be pretty close.

Something like the following

pid_standin := $(shell date +%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S)

file: 
    echo $(pid_standin)

$ Make
2010-10-04_21-01-58

Update: As noted in the comment if you set a variable with name = val syntax it is re-evaluated each time it's used. The := syntax sets it and doesn't re-evaluate the value, though using back-ticks `` seems to get around this somehow. You really want to use the $(shell CMD) construct for stuff like this.

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This does not work. It still evals date ... each time you use $(pid_standin) and thus will create different directories. –  sligocki Oct 5 '10 at 0:50
1  
Shows what happens when I try a simple test case, updated the question with a fix –  Paul Rubel Oct 5 '10 at 12:59
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