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This is not quite a programming question, but it's about a programming environment, so hopefully not too out of place. I need to be able to write chemical formulas in Mathematica text (this is specifically about text, not input/code). Something like: H3O+. But Mathematica can't seem to do this. If you use the normal sub/superscript functions, or hit Cntl-_ or Cntl-6, it puts you in "math mode" even when you are in text, and so the letters become italic, and it puts a space between the 3 and the O. Like this: H3 O+. Ugly, especially with longer chemicals.

Other things in Mathematica work like normal word processors -- you can style fonts as italic, bold, big, small, colored -- but the subscript and superscript functions common in word processors seems to be missing.

Am I missing something? I hope so...

thanks,
Rob

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You might have more luck with this question at superuser.com – marshall.ward Oct 5 '10 at 3:04
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use a trick similar to that used in LaTeX for printing subscripts on the left. That is place the subscript on an object with no width.

To enter math mode type Cntl-( and to exit type Cntl-) .

Attach the sub and superscripts to ⋮null⋮ or ⋮ ⋮ or ⋮- ⋮ (where ⋮ = escape)

Here's how it displays - compared to some expressions in mathmode: the chemical formula for hydronium is HSubscript[[Null], 3]O[Null]^+

I've placed the Cell Expression in a gist for you.

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In ChemData, Mathematica uses contructs like

 Style[
     Row[
          {Subscript["H",3],Superscript["O","+"]}
        ],
          Rule[ScriptBaselineShifts,{0.5`,0.75`}]
      ]

Example:

alt text

HTH!

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