Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this file I get 9 warnings of "assumed special". They are

;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: CHECKARRAY assumed special in SETQ
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: RESULT assumed special in SETQ
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: CHECKARRAY assumed special
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: CHECKARRAY assumed special
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: CHECKARRAY assumed special
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: CHECKARRAY assumed special
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: CHECKARRAY assumed special
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: RESULT assumed special in SETQ
;;;*** Warning in CHECK-ROW: RESULT assumed special

The whole file is just two functions -

(defun get-element (x y board)
 (nth y (nth x board)))

(defun check-row (row board)
 (setq checkarray (make-array 9))
 (setq result T)
 (fill checkarray 0)
 (loop for i upto 8 do
  (setf (aref checkarray (- (get-element row i board) 1))
        (+  (aref checkarray (- (get-element row i board) 1)) 1))
 )
 (loop for i upto 8 do
  (if (or (= (aref checkarray i) 0) (> (aref checkarray i) 1))
      (setq result nil) ())
 )
 result)

I don't get any errors and the functions seem to work fine. So why does it say this? And how can I fix it?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The difference is that setq is not, strictly speaking, supposed to be used to define a variable (I am not exactly sure why, since it does define a variable).

Use defvar for globals and the let construct for locals.

share|improve this answer
3  
It's not that it's not supposed to define a variable. It's that it's not sure YOU want to define a variable. If you (defvar checkarray) and then later (setq checkarary (make-array 9)), it will happily do what you ask. But with the warning set, the setq will issue a warning. You can always disable the warnings as well. –  Will Hartung Oct 5 '10 at 4:57

Any variable not defined may be assumed to be special. Another interpretation also does not really make sense.

You may either

  • introduce your variables as global special variables using DEFVAR or DEFPARAMETER

or

  • introduce your variables as local lexical variables using DEFUN, LAMBDA, FLET, LABELS, LET, LET* or others

or

  • declare your variables as special or declare the variable reference as special. Usually this is not what one wants.

Anyway, SETQ does not define a or declare a variable. All it does is that it sets an existing variable to some value.

Avoid setting undefined/declared variables with SETQ in code. Its exact consequences are undefined in the ANSI Common Lisp standard.

share|improve this answer

Rainer Joswig's answer is correct in general. In your case, I don't see any need for these variables to be global, so the best thing to do is use let to make them local to the body of your function:

(defun check-row (row board)
  (let ((checkarray (make-array 9)) (result t))
    (fill checkarray 0)
    (loop for i upto 8 do
         (setf (aref checkarray (- (get-element row i board) 1))
               (+  (aref checkarray (- (get-element row i board) 1)) 1)))
    (loop for i upto 8 do
         (if (or (= (aref checkarray i) 0) (> (aref checkarray i) 1))
             (setq result nil) ()))
    result))

Edit: Also, since you're just adding 1 to a place, you can use incf instead of that long setf:

(defun check-row (row board)
  (let ((checkarray (make-array 9)) (result t))
    (fill checkarray 0)
    (loop for i upto 8 do
         (incf (aref checkarray (- (get-element row i board) 1))))
    (loop for i upto 8 do
         (if (or (= (aref checkarray i) 0) (> (aref checkarray i) 1))
             (setq result nil) ()))
    result))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.