Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to fill a structure (does not have to be an actual struct), with data loaded from a byte[].

There are many different data structures in the byte[], one of them is a string, which is declared as:

UInt16 stringLenght
byte[stringLenght] zeroTerminatedString

I 'c' language this could be handled by declaring a fixed size struct, and instead of a the struct containing the actual string, make a pointer to the string.

Something like:

UInt16 stringLength
char* zeroTerminatedString

Is there a (smart) way to do something similar in c#? I mean loading binary data from a file/memory and filling it into a structure?

Regards Jakob Justesen

share|improve this question
2  
Your proposed C code is faulty so your chances of converting it to C# are doomed! –  Phil J Pearson Oct 5 '10 at 11:32
    
It depends. How many data records? How big are they? –  Prof. Falken Oct 5 '10 at 11:34
add comment

2 Answers

That's not how you'd declare it in C. If the record in the file contains a string then you'd declare the structure similar to:

struct Example {
    int mumble;   // Anything, not necessarily a string length
    char text[42];
    // etc...
};

The equivalent C# declaration would look like:

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
    private struct Example {
        public int mumble;
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 42)]
        public string text;
        // etc...
    }

You'd normally use BinaryReader to read the data. But it cannot handle strings like this directly, you have to read them as a byte[] and do the string conversion yourself. You also cannot take advantage of the declarative syntax, you have to write a call for each individual member of the struct.

There's a workaround for that, the Marshal class already knows how to convert unmanaged structures to managed ones with the PtrToStructure() method. Here's a generic implementation, it works for any blittable type. Two versions, a static one that reads from a byte[] and an instance method that was optimized to repeatedly read from a stream. You'd use a FileStream or MemoryStream with that one.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

class StructTranslator {
    public static bool Read<T>(byte[] buffer, int index, ref T retval) {
        if (index == buffer.Length) return false;
        int size = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T));
        if (index + size > buffer.Length) throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
        var handle = GCHandle.Alloc(buffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
        try {
            IntPtr addr = (IntPtr)((long)handle.AddrOfPinnedObject() + index);
            retval = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(addr, typeof(T));
        }
        finally {
            handle.Free();
        }
        return true;
    }

    public bool Read<T>(Stream stream, ref T retval) {
        int size = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T));
        if (buffer == null || size > buffer.Length) buffer = new byte[size];
        int len = stream.Read(buffer, 0, size);
        if (len == 0) return false;
        if (len != size) throw new EndOfStreamException();
        var handle = GCHandle.Alloc(buffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
        try {
            retval = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), typeof(T));
        }
        finally {
            handle.Free();
        }
        return true;
    }

    private byte[] buffer;
}

Untested, hope it works.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The Marshal should be able to do this for you.

Note that this can only be done to a struct and you will probably need to use the StructLayout attribute.

I'm not 100% sure on how to handle the string or arrays, but BStrWrapper or ArrayWithOffset MIGHT help, also keep on the lookout for similar classes/attributes (I know I have done stuff like this before for binding to native functions).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.