Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created an object called 'DateTracker' which conforms to NSCoding, so it contains encodeWithCoder and initWithCoder methods. When I initialise it, I call the following:

DateTracker *currentTracker = [[DateTracker alloc] initFromFile];

The initFromFile method looks like this:

- (id)initFromFile { 
    NSString *filePath = [self dataFilePath];
    if ([[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:filePath error:NULL]) {
        NSData *data = [[NSMutableData alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:filePath];
        NSKeyedUnarchiver *unarchiver = [[NSKeyedUnarchiver alloc] initForReadingWithData:data];
        self = [unarchiver decodeObjectForKey:kDateDataKey];
        [unarchiver finishDecoding];
        [unarchiver release];
        [data release];
    }
    return self;
}

However when I try to call

[currentTracker release];

my app crashes.

When I run the app with performance tools to check for memory leaks, it complains that I'm not releasing this object.

Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This line:

self = [unarchiver decodeObjectForKey:kDateDataKey];

is going to give you problems.

What you're doing is to allocate a DateTracker object ([DateTracker alloc]), then create a new DateTracker object (by -decodeObjectForKey:) and make the "self" pointer refer to the new object. There are two problems with that:

  • you no longer have a reference to the old object, so it's leaked
  • the new object is not retained, so it goes away (or causes a crash if you try to release it)

I would say the approach of having an object replace itself is a bit suspect. Perhaps you would do better to move the filePath variable outside of the DateTracker object, and unarchive it by something like:

DateTracker *currentTracker = [[DateTracker unarchiveFromFile:filePath] retain];

where unarchiveFromFile: is a class method that does essentially what initFromFile did, without messing with self:

+ (DateTracker*)unarchiveFromFile:(NSString *)filePath { 
    DateTracker *result = nil;
    if ([[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:filePath error:NULL]) {
        NSData *data = [[NSMutableData alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:filePath];
        NSKeyedUnarchiver *unarchiver = [[NSKeyedUnarchiver alloc] initForReadingWithData:data];
        result = [unarchiver decodeObjectForKey:kDateDataKey];
        [unarchiver finishDecoding];
        [unarchiver release];
        [data release];
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Aaaaah I see. Would it still work if I kept the file path initialiser inside the DateTracker class though? So the first line of the unarchiveFromFile method would get the filePath string. –  Smikey Oct 5 '10 at 16:25
    
Also, what would happen if I just changed my initFromFile method into a class method and called it like so: DateTracker *currentTracker = [DateTracker initFromFile]. Would it autorelease when it wasn't being used? Or should I explicitly retain and release it? Or would that just be a bad idea anyway... –  Smikey Oct 5 '10 at 16:28
    
Sure, filePath could be a static member of the DateTracker class. The point about autorelease is that decodeObjectForKey: is going to return an autoreleased object (according to the normal Cocoa memory management conventions, since it doesn't have "Alloc" or "Copy" in its name, you know that it returns an autoreleased object). So, you need to retain/release it if you want to hang on to it. –  David Gelhar Oct 5 '10 at 16:39
    
Ah great, thanks for the explanation! So what happend when I create say a UIImage as follows: UIImage *image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"theImage.png"]; Since it's a class method, it's autoreleased right? But if I want to use it again I should add a retain message. But if I don't add a retain message, is there no need to call [image release]? Thanks for the help btw! –  Smikey Oct 6 '10 at 9:32
    
Also, I'm a little unclear about class methods. I can't use class variables or refer to other class methods within them? So to initialise the correct filePath, I either need to pass it as an argument, or set it as a static variable as you suggest. But if I set it as a static variable, I can't be sure the file system won't change and it will be incorrect. And if I pass it as an argument, I might initialise it incorrectly in another class. My dataFilePath method currently resides inside the DateTracker class, so I can be sure it will always return the same result... –  Smikey Oct 6 '10 at 10:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.