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I am developing an application for iPhone and one part of it deals with a list of currencies and daily exchange rates. I am using SQLite to store all these rates.

Now I came to the part where I want to make the update part of my database with the new exchange rates.

The first thought was make a request to a server with a specific date and to read back an XML containing something like:

<date value="2010-10-04">
  <currency name="EUR" rate="xxx" />
  <currency name="USD" rate="yyy" />
  <currency name="GBP" rate="zzz" />
........
</date>
<date value="2010-10-05">
  <currency name="EUR" rate="xxx" />
  <currency name="USD" rate="yyy" />
  <currency name="GBP" rate="zzz" />
........
</date>

But now I was thinking isn't it better to make my own format, something like:

#|2010-10-04#EURxxx#USDyyy#GBPzzz#|2010-10-05#EURxxx#USDyyy#GBPzzz##

The separator will be #. Known that always the date takes 11 characters and starts with | and currency code takes 3 characters, I can search the rate until I will find a # sign.

Because I want to send as little data as I can I think this second approach will be better than the usual XML, even if I reduce the XML to:

<d v="2010-10-04">
  <c name="EUR" r="xxx" />
  <c name="USD" r="yyy" />
  <c name="GBP" r="zzz" />
........
</d>
<d v="2010-10-05">
  <c name="EUR" r="xxx" />
  <c name="USD" r="yyy" />
  <c name="GBP" r="zzz" />
........
</d>

What are your pro & cons for this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The pros:

  • As you already stated, it is shorter, faster to retrieve.
  • Faster to parse as well

The cons:

  • If you develop the server side and the other developer on the mobile side, then he may get confused when there are no meanings

  • It is hard to scale when you have more and more attributes and if you delete or change some attributes, you have to go over all codes to change it.

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I am developing both mobile and server side. Also I may not have the exact attributes every time, that's why I will parse and find my rates based on the # sign and not necessary by a fixed position. –  Parkyprg Oct 5 '10 at 13:32

XML is easier to read and parse. Unless you're fetching a zillion currencies and daily rates a day, the # of bytes shouldn't be an issue.

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I have done some tests and using XML the data generated for 1 day has 830b and using the other format it is only 310b. If the user makes an update for a lot of days behind, the data sent will be three times less and being on a phone I think it counts. Thank you for your response. –  Parkyprg Oct 6 '10 at 14:58
    
At the margins, this is still immaterial, since they both can be delivered in one packet. In the end, you have your answer. There's no right or wrong here, just options. –  Jordan Oct 6 '10 at 17:36

JSON format would split the difference between a proprietary format and a standard format. It is somewhat less verbose than XML and has the flexibility and maintainability vodkhang rightly expects.

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+1 JSON is indeed lightweight –  Henrik P. Hessel Oct 5 '10 at 14:48

CFPropertyList is pretty good if you're using PHP as your server-side language. Easy to integrate with your server code and has built in support in iOS (e.g. an NSDictionary can be created directly from a plist file).

Link: http://code.google.com/p/cfpropertylist/

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