Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to count up ip addresses found in a log file on two servers and then merge the dictionary stats together without loosing elements or counts. I found a partial solution in another stack overflow question but as you can see it drops the '10.10.0.1':7 pair.

>>> a = {'192.168.1.21':23,'127.0.0.1':5,'12.12.12.12':5,'55.55.55.55':10}
>>> b = {'192.168.1.21':27,'10.10.0.1':7,'127.0.0.1':1}
>>> c = {}
>>> for elem in a:
...     c[elem] = b.get(elem, 0) + a[elem]
...
>>> print c
{'55.55.55.55': 10, '12.12.12.12': 5, '127.0.0.1': 6, '192.168.1.21': 50}

The counts are being added together but if the key doesn't exist in dict a, it gets dropped. I'm having trouble figuring out the last bit of logic... perhaps another for elem in b: if a.get(elem, 0) exists: pass else add it to c?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your code replace c = {} with c = b.copy()

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this resolved my issue quickest. –  user221014 Oct 5 '10 at 16:19

If you have Python 2.7+, try collections.Counter

Otherwise try the following:

a = {'192.168.1.21':23,'127.0.0.1':5,'12.12.12.12':5,'55.55.55.55':10}
b = {'192.168.1.21':27,'10.10.0.1':7,'127.0.0.1':1}
c = {}
for dictionary in (a,b):
    for k,v in dictionary.iteritems():
        c[k] = c.get(k, 0) + v
share|improve this answer
    
I'm on redhat enterprize server 4 server so I have python 2.3.4 : ( –  user221014 Oct 5 '10 at 14:47
    
Does the alternative solution work for you? –  eumiro Oct 5 '10 at 15:01
>>> from collections import Counter
>>> a = {'192.168.1.21':23,'127.0.0.1':5,'12.12.12.12':5,'55.55.55.55':10}
>>> b = {'192.168.1.21':27,'10.10.0.1':7,'127.0.0.1':1}
>>> dict(Counter(a) + Counter(b))
{'55.55.55.55': 10, '10.10.0.1': 7, '12.12.12.12': 5, '127.0.0.1': 6, '192.168.1.21': 50}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like this. –  hughdbrown Oct 5 '10 at 15:12
    
Counter is a dict –  SilentGhost Oct 5 '10 at 15:13
    
yeah, all you need is Counter(a) + Counter(b) –  kristi May 19 '11 at 17:29

How about:

c = dict((k, a.get(k, 0) + b.get(k, 0)) for k in set(a.keys() + b.keys()))
share|improve this answer

This should be a pretty generic answer to your question, if I got it.

def merge_sum_dictionaries(*dicts):
    result_dict = {}
    for d in dicts:
        for key, value in d.iteritems():
            result_dict.setdefault(key, 0)
            result_dict[key] += value
    return result_dict



if __name__ == "__main__":
    a = {'192.168.1.21':23,'127.0.0.1':5,'12.12.12.12':5,'55.55.55.55':10}
    b = {'192.168.1.21':27,'10.10.0.1':7,'127.0.0.1':1}

    print merge_sum_dictionaries(a, b)

Output:

{'55.55.55.55': 10, '10.10.0.1': 7, '12.12.12.12': 5, '127.0.0.1': 6, '192.168.1.21': 50}
share|improve this answer

Solution for python 2.6 and higher:

from collections import defaultdict

def merge_count_dicts(*dicts):
    result = defaultdict(int)
    for d in dicts:
        for k, v in d.items():
            result[k] += v
    return result

def test():
    a = {'192.168.1.21':23,'127.0.0.1':5,'12.12.12.12':5,'55.55.55.55':10}
    b = {'192.168.1.21':27,'10.10.0.1':7,'127.0.0.1':1}
    c = merge_count_dicts(a, b)
    print c

if __name__ == '__main_':
    test()
share|improve this answer
    
That's the other way to setdefault() :P –  Alan Franzoni Oct 5 '10 at 15:15
    
OP's using python-2.3 –  SilentGhost Oct 5 '10 at 15:17
    
@SG: just saw that... –  hughdbrown Oct 5 '10 at 15:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.