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Writing an operator< () for a struct appears to be clearer than writing the classical trivalue compare.

for example, to sort the following

struct S {
    int val;
};

you can write an operator< ()

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r ) {
     return l.val < r.val;
}

or, a trivalue function (usually in the following fashion )

int compare( const S &l, const S &r ) {
    if( r.val > l.val ) return 1;
    if( r.val < l.val ) return -1;
    return 0;
}

The former is clearer, therefore you can say there's better code quality. The latter forces you to think of 3 cases, which complicates code.

But this thought is a bit deceiving in more complex structures:

struct S {
    int x;
    int y;
};

the following is clear, and begginners tend to write it like so

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r ) {
     if( l.x < r.x ) return true;
     if( l.y < r.y ) return true;
     return false;
}

but it's wrong ! You can't sort correctly with this !

And it takes some time to think that you actually have to write it like so

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r ) {
     if( l.x < r.x ) return true;
     if( l.x > r.x ) return false;
     if( l.y < r.y ) return true;
     if( l.y > r.y ) return false;
     return false;
}

for it to work correctly.

Can you, and do you write this sort of compare function in a nicer/clearer manner ? The old trivalue compare function at least 'forced' you into thinking about >, <, and == cases.

share|improve this question
    
i don't see any difference between the last two operator< functions. –  Donotalo Oct 5 '10 at 15:24
2  
@Donotalo: Then look more carefully. –  Charles Bailey Oct 5 '10 at 15:27
    
got it. phew! .. –  Donotalo Oct 5 '10 at 15:33
    
to test how it fails, make a set<S>, add a few (~30) x-y pairs in, it, making sure that some are duplicates. Then print the size of the set. Do it for both versions of the operator< () above. –  Grim Fandango Oct 5 '10 at 15:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The thing is that you are fine with just declaring one trivalue compare function if you autogenerate all operators using: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barton%E2%80%93Nackman_trick

share|improve this answer
    
+1, Very reminiscent of Haskell. This would also have been my advice. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 5 '10 at 15:19
1  
@Let_Me_Be: it's called boost::less_than_comparable from Boost.Operators. Very handy, but doesn't solve the issue of writing a proper operator< in the first place. –  Matthieu M. Oct 5 '10 at 18:45
1  
@Let_Me_Be: I don't understand what you mean. Whether you write operator< or cmp is still writing a method that you need to get right, and both are of equal complexity... –  Matthieu M. Oct 6 '10 at 6:16
1  
@Let_Me_be: no, operator< is enough. lhs > rhs as rhs < lhs, lhs <= rhs as !(rhs < lhs) and lhs >= rhs as !(lhs < rhs). You also have lhs == rhs as !(lhs < rhs) && !(rhs < lhs) and lhs != rhs as lhs < rhs || rhs < lhs. May have gotten some wrong, but that's the gist of the reasoning. And that's what Boost.Operators use (and Boost.Operators works, really, and uses the Barton-Nackman trick). –  Matthieu M. Oct 6 '10 at 9:24
1  
@Let_Me_Be: note that the two comparisons only occurs with == and != and that writing cmp might be a pessimization if you actually need two comparisons to define it, that will then always be used :) Also, because of this pessimization, Boost.Operators normally require == to be defined separately and does not infer it from <, it does infer != from == though. –  Matthieu M. Oct 6 '10 at 9:36

If I don't care about performance or compiler spew, I tend to use this:

return make_tuple(l.x, l.y, ...) < make_tuple(r.x, r.y, ...);

And for a slightly less expensive in terms of copies version:

return tie(cref(l.x), cref(l.y), ...) < tie(cref(r.x), cref(r.y), ...);

Incidentally, the second version also works with lvalues.

share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting idea. But wouldn't return tie(l.x, l.y, ...) < tie(r.x, r.y, ...); avoid a copy? (I assume this creates tuples of references). –  UncleBens Oct 5 '10 at 16:42
    
@UncleBens... holy crap, I didn't think of that! I guess my initial disclaimer was even worse than I thought :) Although it doesn't work if l or r are or contain const values. –  MSN Oct 5 '10 at 17:00
    
Seems to compile for me (GCC 4.3): it creates const references. –  UncleBens Oct 5 '10 at 17:28
    
+1 for UncleBens comment :) Do include it in your answer, it certainly is the best way! –  Matthieu M. Oct 5 '10 at 18:46
    
@UncleBens, on VC8, it barfs saying none of the two overloads could convert all the argument types. :( –  MSN Oct 5 '10 at 21:21

I like to do it like this:

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r )
{
    if( l.x != r.x ) return l.x < r.x;
    else return l.y < r.y;
}

EDIT: note that this is also one useful feature of std::pair too - it defines this already so you can't make the mistake.

share|improve this answer

In the int case you can simply write:

return l.x < r.x || (l.x == r.x && l.y < r.y);

Only of you are talking about a type that doesn't have == with the correct behaviour do you need to use something more complex, even then it's not too bad.

return l.x < r.x || (!(r.x < l.x) && l.y < r.y);

Extending to more members:

return l.x < r.x ||
      !(r.x < l.x) && (l.y < r.y ||
      !(r.y < l.y) && (l.z < r.z ||
      /* ... */
      ) /* lisp-like sequence of ) */ );

If you can arrange your members to be in an array or other container you can use std::lexicographical_compare.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, I like the lexicographical_compare idea !! –  Grim Fandango Oct 5 '10 at 15:47

This is no clearer or shorter than your last example, but it does have the advantage of not requiring anything other than operator< on the members.

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r ) { 
     if( l.x < r.x ) return true; 
     if( r.x < l.x ) return false; 
     if( l.y < r.y ) return true; 
     if( r.y < l.y ) return false; 
     return false; 
} 

The last case can always be simplified, unfortunately the prior cases must always be the longer form.

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r ) { 
     if( l.x < r.x ) return true; 
     if( r.x < l.x ) return false; 
     return  l.y < r.y; 
} 
share|improve this answer

One thing I did once which seemed a useful idiom was to write a compare function which returns a boolean given takes two arguments plus a boolean called "bias". The function returns true if the first argument is greater, or if "bias" is set and the two arguments are equal. Thus, a compare whose result depended upon two sub-comparisons would be:

  if (compare(a.part1,b.part1,compare(a.part2,b.part2,bias)))
    ...

Note that this will do 'extra' comparisons, since part2's will be compared even if the part1 compare would be sufficient to yield an answer, but if avoids redundant tests for equality.

Otherwise, using tri-value logic, one could do something like:

  int result;

  if ((result = compare(a.part1,b.part1)) != 0) return result;
  if ((result = compare(a.part2,b.part2)) != 0) return result;

The latter form avoids unnecessary comparisons, and is easily extensible to any number of fields.

share|improve this answer

For the first tri-value compare() function

int compare( const S &l, const S &r ) {
    return r.val - l.val;
}

For the later

bool operator< ( const S &l, const S &r ) {
     return (l.x < r.x) || ((l.x == r.x) && (l.y < r.y));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The tri-value version cannot be used in the general case, because the result may under- or overflow. –  UncleBens Oct 5 '10 at 16:37

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