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Consider the following scenario. I have a number of classes that share a common base class and I have defined an automapper mapping for each derived class. Something like this:

class A : Base {}

class B : Base {}

class ContractA : ContractBase {}

class ContractB : ContractBase {}

void Foo()
{
    Mapper.CreateMap<A, ContractA>();
    Mapper.CreateMap<B, ContractB>();
}

So far so good. But now I want to create a method like this:

ContractBase Foo()
{
    Base obj = GetObject();

    return Mapper.???
}

The problem is that all of AutoMapper's Map variants require that I either know the destination type at compile time or have an object of that type available at runtime. This is seriously frustrating since I have defined only one map for each source type. AutoMapper should be able to infer the destination type given only the source type.

Is there any good way around this? I want to avoid creating a dictionary mapping source types to destination types. While this would work, it would mean that I'd essentially have to define two mappings for every source type.

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1  
use valueinjecter.codeplex.com –  Omu Oct 5 '10 at 20:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could access the mappings stored in AutoMapper:

ContractBase Foo() {
  Base obj = GetObject();

  var sourceType = obj.GetType();
  var destinationType = Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps().
    Where(map => map.SourceType == sourceType).
    // Note: it's assumed that you only have one mapping for the source type!
    Single(). 
    DestinationType;

  return (ContractBase)Mapper.Map(obj, sourceType, destinationType);
}
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You can turn it around and ask Base to give you a mapped contract:

ContractBase Foo() {
  Base obj = GetObject();
  return obj.ToContract();
}

With this code:

abstract class Base {
  public abstract ContractBase ToContract();
}
class A : Base {
  public override ContractBase ToContract() {
    return Mapper.Map<A, ContractA>(this);
  }
}
class B : Base {
  public override ContractBase ToContract() {
    return Mapper.Map<B, ContractB>(this);
  }
}

UPDATE: if you must separate the logic from the classes, you could use a visitor:

ContractBase Foo() {
  Base obj = GetObject();
  var visitor = new MapToContractVisitor();
  obj.Accept(visitor);
  return visitor.Contract;
}

This is what it looks like:

abstract class Base {
  public abstract void Accept(IBaseVisitor visitor);
}
class A : Base {
  public override void Accept(IBaseVisitor visitor) {
    visitor.Visit(this);
  }
}
class B : Base {
  public override void Accept(IBaseVisitor visitor) {
    visitor.Visit(this);
  }
}
interface IBaseVisitor {
  void Visit(A a);
  void Visit(B b);
}
class MapToContractVisitor : IBaseVisitor {
  public ContractBase Contract { get; private set; }
  public void Visit(A a) {
    Contract = Mapper.Map<A, ContractA>(a); 
  }
  public void Visit(B b) {
    Contract = Mapper.Map<B, ContractB>(b);
  }
}

Now, all the mapper logic is in the MapToContractVisitor class, not in the Base hierarchy classes.

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That's clever, but unfortunately it doesn't work for us. The classes in question represent messages to different systems. They aren't mutually aware of each other. –  Peter Ruderman Oct 5 '10 at 20:36
    
OK, let me try again.... –  Jordão Oct 5 '10 at 20:45
    
This doesn't really solve the original problem. My issue is not that I see no way to do the mapping, but that I want to avoid duplication of effort. With this solution, I must do two things every time I add a new pair of classes. First, I must define the automapper mapping, then I must create a visitor method. I'm hoping for a way to define just the mapping and nothing else. –  Peter Ruderman Oct 6 '10 at 15:36
    
There are two things you need to do anyway: Mapper.CreateMap and later Mapper.Map. This code deals with the Mapper.Map. You could also centralize it all in the visitor, and put the Mapper.CreateMap in its static constructor, for example. Then, just one class knows about these mappings. –  Jordão Oct 6 '10 at 15:53
    
I guess I haven't explained this very well. A very common scenario I envision in the future is having to add new pairs of mapped classes. I want to structure things such that, in this scenario, the only line the programmer has to write is Mapper.CreateMap<newClass, newClassContract>(). –  Peter Ruderman Oct 6 '10 at 20:30

I think Mapper.DynamicMap() and its various overloads are what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems these methods simply map one object onto another (instead of returning a new object). They still require the destination type. –  Peter Ruderman Oct 5 '10 at 18:53

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