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I am developing a theory music web page. In music notation there are some symbols like "flat" and "sharp" that can be achieved with standar characters like "b" and "#", but the final output is very unpleasant.

I have instaled special fonts to use these (and many other) music symbols, but obviously they are not installed in the vast majority of computers.

1.- Is there a way to safely use this fonts?

2.- If so, what HTML tag should I use? Will it be Ok to use the span Tag with a Class="MusicNotation" inside a p Tag to change the font of these music symbols via CSS? Is there a better ( more standar ) way to do this?

I provide an example of what I will do

This is the HTML

<p>This is a <spam class="MusicNotation">G#</spam>chord</p>

And this is the CSS:

#MusicNotation { font-family: Repreise }
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spam? you actually mean span? :) –  netrox Oct 5 '10 at 20:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will help you:

There are also HTML code alternatives for making music note symbols. There are officially 7 music note symbols that can be displayed through HTML codes. Just copy and paste or type these following codes. Numbers should always be preceded by the ampersand and sharp sign, and should end with a semi-colon. For the quarter music note, you should type &#9833; and it should look like this: ♩.

To make an eighth music note, type &#9834; and it should look like this: ♪.

To make a beamed eighth music note, type &#9835; and it should look like this: ♫.

To make a beamed sixteenth music note, type &#9836; and it should look like this: ♬

To make a music flat sign, type &#9837; and it should look like this: ♭

To make a music natural sign, type &#9838 and it should look like this: ♮

To make a music sharp sign, type &#9839 and it should look like this: ♯.

http://www.howtodothings.com/hobbies/how-to-write-music-note-code

Be sure to use <meta charset="utf-8">

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+1 for providing the actual codes. Do you know how universal the support is for these symbols? –  Mark Ransom Oct 6 '10 at 18:03
    
pretty good support, actually. From IE7 and all modern browsers support it. If they don't show up, they likely have old browsers. Don't use non-standard fonts (use ARIAL or TIMES NEW ROMAN) –  netrox Oct 6 '10 at 18:21
    
I'm impressed that these show up both at work in IE7 and home in Firefox; usually one or the other will screw up. –  Mark Ransom Oct 7 '10 at 2:43

Don't use a font-family that is unlikely to be installed on the target machines.

I'm assuming those symbols are available in Unicode somehwere, but there are many fonts that won't contain a full Unicode set and they'll show up as little boxes or worse.

@font-face is the new technology for embedding a font into a page, but you'll have to do some grunt work to get it working.

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If you are open on using Flash, you can use sIFR. Take a look here: http://www.mikeindustries.com/blog/sifr

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