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I understand the behavior of const-qualified data types. I am curious, though, if there is any performance gain or loss from over- or under-zealousness of qualifying variables as const. I am thinking particularly of variables declared and used exclusively within an isolated code block. For example, something like:

const qreal padding = CalculatePadding();
const QSizeF page_size = CalculatePagePreviewSize(padding);
const QRectF content_rect = CalculatePagePreviewContentRect(page_size);
const QList<QRectF> pages = renderer.BuildPrintPages(printer_, map_scene_);
const QFont page_number_font = CalculatePageNumberFont();
const QFontMetrics metrics(page_number_font);

Suppose I only need const-qualified methods on all of these (and more.) Is there any performance gain in declaring them all const? Or, conversely, does this actually hurt performance?

I am curious for both run-time performance (I am guessing this makes no difference as the const is exclusively a compile-time check--can someone confirm?) and compile-time performance. I do not have enough experience with c++ to have a feel for this, and am wondering if I should err on the side of over- or under-applying const when all other things (maintainability, etc.) are equal.

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in most cases, no run-time performance difference –  Anycorn Oct 5 '10 at 19:34
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dupe? stackoverflow.com/questions/3435026/… –  Anycorn Oct 5 '10 at 19:36
    
Qt is much copy-on-write so I suspect const can have a real effect here. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 5 '10 at 19:42
    
When in doubt, profile! –  Thomas Matthews Oct 5 '10 at 20:04
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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

const is mainly a compile-time thing, however, declaring something as const sometimes allows for certain optimizations. If the code in question isn't a performance bottleneck, I wouldn't worry about it and just use const as intended: to produce clearer code and prevent yourself from doing stupid things.

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My understanding is that const can be used by the compiler to potentially optimize performance, but is no guarantee of such; there shouldn't be a performance downside, though. It could potentially affect runtime behavior (ie: the compiler could put const variables on read-only memory pages).

It should not have a significant impact on performance, but I'd error on using it more for ease of code maintenance. Just my opinion, though.

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While the answer is technically "yes", the practical answer is NO. It's true that the compiler can, under certain circumstances, perform code optimizations by taking into account that a given value cannot change or that a method will not modify the owning object. However, these will be situational cases and so incredibly far down in the weeds of optimization that it would almost certainly be a mistake to take it into account up front.

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In my (limited) experience, const CAN hurt the performance by quite a lot (surprise!) Namely, when working with container classes be careful what cont-ness does: for arrays it might simply force the compiler to create a copy of your container (e.g., an array) once a single element is accessed for reading only... This was a huge pain to locate in the code that I am working on.

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const is just there to help you catch errors at compile time. However since there's this thing called the const_cast you can always change the constness of any variable so the compiler really can't get away with optimizing anything away. (You can also have fun with c-style casts to get rid of constness which could make optimizations invalid.)

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avoid const_cast at all times, and use it only when you have no choice (eg: you're working with an external lib you can't change the interface of, but know modifying a const object is "safe enough"). –  rubenvb Oct 5 '10 at 19:52
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This is not really true. If you defined a variable as const, you cannot cast that away and write to it. A compiler that caches a variable value based on the fact that the variable is const is alright. Any program that writes to a const variable has undefined behavior. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 5 '10 at 20:41
    
Johannes - first result from a google search on const and optimization: gotw.ca/gotw/081.htm - try it yourself, you can write to an unconstified variable –  miked Oct 5 '10 at 21:27
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The link you referred to is a different situation, where you get a constant reference to a possibly not constant object. Johannes refers to the situation where the original variable is declared as const type name, and modifying name there is undefined behavior. Consider for example, that a conforming compiler could decide to place that variable in ROM instead of regular memory, or in a read-only memory page. In both cases, trying to modify the variable could fail silently or crash the application. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 5 '10 at 22:01
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i.e. If you add const-ness to a non-const object by binding it to a constant reference, you cast away the const-ness and modify it, that is ok. But you cannot cast away the const-ness of an object that is const. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 5 '10 at 22:03
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