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I have a process which I break into multiple processes and even when using threading it takes a very long time to complete.

I'd like to give the user an indication of the status of the execution in a cute way.

(for each process % complete) Maybe betting the right horse will ease the pain :)

I found this project long ago: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/WPF/GuidedTourWPF_1.aspx

I have two questions:

  1. This article was written in 2007, is there better way to achieve this graphic effect?
  2. I have not understood yet, how the application is started, so I'd like to know if I can integrate such "window" in my window application?

*Edit: Adam Robinson pointed that the second question is not clear: The application generates a window as in the picture below - I like to know if it possible to insert it in my "normal" windows application.

alt text

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WPF is certainly still relevant. WPF is the preferred thick-client .NET GUI framework. As for your other questions, you need to be more specific. Don't ask people to read an article or download a project; ask specific questions. –  Adam Robinson Oct 5 '10 at 20:20
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WPF is relevant. Though I'm not a huge fan of using WPF for the web as it only runs in IE - which is not acceptable. I just wish it had a better name... like Project Chuck Norris. –  Ryan Ternier Oct 5 '10 at 20:21
    
@Ryan Ternier, WPF can run in any browser that has a plugin (it works fine in Firefox) –  Thomas Levesque Oct 5 '10 at 21:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted
  • This article was written in 2007, is there better way to achieve this graphic effect?

WPF is the current "best" (or at least most feature-rich) way to develop a Windows Application for the desktop.

  • I have not understood yet, how the application is started, so I'd like to know if I can integrate such "window" in my window application?

Make your application a WPF Application. This will automatically give you an application, Window class, and everything else you need to get started. Making a WPF application is just like any other application, except that you need to start the message pump, create the application, setup your startup window, etc. The "WPF Application" template in Visual Studio does all of that for you...

Until you understand what all is happening, I'd recommend starting with that, and customizing from there.

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Its another media isn't it? When I started my project I selected "windows form application" and if I got you right now I need to select "WPF application" ... those project can not play together for example I can not put a WPF form in windows form MDI parent right? –  Asaf Oct 5 '10 at 20:34
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@Asaf: If you want to do WPF, I would not recommend doing a Windows Forms project/application. Better to just make a WPF application from the start. (Though you can, technically, use ElementHost to host a WPF UserControl inside of a Windows Forms application -but it's really not a great idea for new development) –  Reed Copsey Oct 5 '10 at 20:47

If you choose to stick with a win form for the main app, you can still host the desired window/control via an ElementHostControl. (hosts wpf inside winform).

Blessings, Jeff

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