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I have the follow classes (C# for example)

class A
{
    private static Dictionary<int, A> idLookup;
    ....
    private A(id) {...}
    public static A Get(id) 
    {
        //does some magic
        if (...) { return idLookup[id]; }
        else { A a = new A(id); idLookup[a.id] = a; return a; }
    }
}

class B
{
    private static Dictionary<int, B> idLookup;
    ....
    private B(id) {...}
    public static B Get(id) 
    {
        //does some magic
        if (...) { return idLookup[id]; }
        else { B b = new B(id); idLookup[b.id] = b; return b; }
    }
}
... and so on

Is there a design pattern (was doing inheritance but that got a bit messy) that can remove all that duplicate code?

The above functionality guarantees that only 1 instance of A/B/... exists for an id.

share|improve this question
    
It's not that much duplicate code. You could write a more specialized dictionary to make it easier, then it would be a one-liner. –  Stefan Steinegger Oct 5 '10 at 20:59
    
so this is a single-threaded program, I assume? –  Kirk Woll Oct 5 '10 at 21:05
    
@Kirk Wool, yes... this stuff is gonna fail pretty spectacularly in multi-threaded code. –  jameszhao00 Oct 5 '10 at 21:10
    
Now that I think about it, it's probably best to have a manager class that handles the creation/fetching –  jameszhao00 Oct 5 '10 at 21:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use generics. Code/PseudoCode:

class UniquePattern<T>
{
    private static Dictionary<int, T> idLookup;
    ....
    private T(id) {...}
    public static T Get(id) 
    {
       ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
There's a where T : new() type constraint for a parameter-less constructor, but there are no such type parameter constraints for constructors with specific parameters... i.e. where T : new(int) isn't valid C#. -- That said, generics seem to be the way to go here. –  stakx Oct 5 '10 at 21:05
    
each time i rediscover the "where" syntax and each time i'm amazed :) @stakx oww i talked too fast, then –  samy Oct 5 '10 at 21:05
    
Yes, you are right. I had used new() but I was surprised it does not support parameterful constructor. I have removed it. –  Aliostad Oct 5 '10 at 21:10

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