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C# chokes on

delegate void Bar<T>(T t);

void foo(Bar bar)
{
    bar.Invoke("hello");
    bar.Invoke(42);
}

The workaround is to use an interface

interface Bar
{
    void Invoke<T>(T t);
}

but now I need to go out of my way to define the implementations of the interface. Can I achieve the same thing with delegates and simple methods?

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2  
What is it that you're trying to achieve? A method that takes a string cannot take an int at the same time. Delegates do not have "overloads". –  dtb Oct 5 '10 at 22:03
    
@dtb, but delegates can take generic arguments, and those types can be inferred. –  Kirk Woll Oct 5 '10 at 22:05
    
@Kirk Woll: Sure. But an instance of Action<string> still cannot be invoked with an int. And you cannot have instances of a generic delegate type that is not closed. –  dtb Oct 5 '10 at 22:07
    
@dtb, that is true. And so, the reason the OP's code doesn't work to begin with is because the parameter type Bar doesn't actually exist -- because it represents a discrete type from Bar<T>. –  Kirk Woll Oct 5 '10 at 22:09

3 Answers 3

This is not possible because you cannot assign an open generic method to a delegate. It would be an interesting new feature to suggest, but currently C# does not allow it.

Possible workarounds:

delegate void Bar(object t);

void foo(Bar bar)
{
    bar.Invoke("hello");
    bar.Invoke(42);
}

void BarMethod(object t)
{
    if (t is int)
        // ...
    else if (t is string)
        // ...
}

foo(BarMethod);

delegate void Bar<T>(T t);

void foo(Bar<string> stringBar, Bar<int> intBar)
{
    stringBar.Invoke("hello");
    intBar.Invoke(42);
}

void BarMethod<T>(T t)
{
    // ...
}

foo(BarMethod<string>, BarMethod<int>);

The interface workaround you already mentioned:

interface IBar
{
    void Invoke<T>(T t);
}

void foo(IBar bar)
{
    bar.Invoke("hello");
    bar.Invoke(42);
}

class BarType : IBar
{
    public void Invoke<T>(T t)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

foo(new BarType());
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The solutions listed are fine, but the problem has not been correctly identified. I do not see where in the OP's code an attempt is made to assign a "an open generic method to a delegate". The OP's code does not compile because one cannot declare a reference to an instance of an open generic delegate-type without a generic type parameter (except in a generic class). Alternatively one could say that there is no type called Bar in the OP's code. There is a type called Bar<>, but it would not be possible for foo to accepted a parameter of this type without making the method generic. –  Ani Oct 6 '10 at 1:42
    
@Ani: I thought a step further than you. Imagine you could have an instance of an open generic delegate type (irrespective of whether it’s called Bar or has some special syntax). What would you assign to it? An open generic method, of course. –  Timwi Oct 6 '10 at 12:10

Maybe your example does not quite illustrate your intention but what is the point of generics here? You are not using the the type T in any useful manner and I would be using object instead of T.

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It may be his intention to assign an open generic method to the delegate. C# does not currently allow this. –  Timwi Oct 5 '10 at 22:21
    
I cannot see the benefit. What is the benefit instead of using plain object? –  Aliostad Oct 5 '10 at 22:27
    
Static typing. Compile-time type checking. –  Timwi Oct 5 '10 at 22:30

I can see some usefulness to having e.g. a "SerializeSomething(thing as T)" routine which would have a type it could pass along to other generics. Unfortunately, I think such a delegate would have to have some extra type information associated with it to make such generics work. For example, the type T may not be the actual type of "thing". If "thing" is declared as SomeBaseType but is actually a DerivativeOfSomeBaseType, the code SerializeSomething(thing) will call SerializeSomething(thing). I know of nothing means in the delegate mechanism by which type SomeBaseType would get passed to the target of a delegate.

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