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I am looking to do some error checking for my command line arguments

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    if(args[0] == null)
    {
        System.out.println("Proper Usage is: java program filename");
        System.exit(0);
    }
}

However, this returns an array out of bounds exception, which makes sense. I am just looking for the proper usage.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 48 down vote accepted

The arguments can never be null. They just wont exist.

In other words, what you need to do is check the length of your arguments.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    // Check how many arguments were passed in
    if(args.length == 0)
    {
        System.out.println("Proper Usage is: java program filename");
        System.exit(0);
    }
}
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Thank you –  Bobby S Oct 6 '10 at 1:18
    
@Bobby, you are welcome! –  jjnguy Oct 6 '10 at 1:48

@jjnguy's answer is correct in most circumstances. You won't ever see a null String in the argument array (or a null array) if main is called by running the application is run from the command line in the normal way.

However, if some other part of the application calls a main method, it is conceivable that it might pass a null argument or null argument array. This is clearly a highly unusual use-case, and an egregious violation of the implied contract for a main entrypoint method. Therefore, I don't think you should bother checking for null values. In the unlikely event that they do occur, I'd say that it is acceptable for the calling code to get a NullPointerException.

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To expand upon this point:

It is possible that the args variable itself will be null, but not via normal execution. Normal execution will use java.exe as the entry point from the command line. However, I have seen some programs that use compiled C++ code with JNI to use the jvm.dll, bypassing the java.exe entirely. In this case, it is possible to pass NULL to the main method, in which case args will be null.

I recommend always checking if ((args == null) || (args.length == 0)), or if ((args != null) && (args.length > 0)) depending on your need.

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You should check for (args == null || args.length == 0). Although the null check isn't really needed, it is a good practice.

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If you don't pass any argument then even in that case args gets initialized but without any item/element. Try the following one, you will get the same effect:

 
public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        String [] dummy= new String [] {};
        if(dummy[0] == null)
        {
            System.out.println("Proper Usage is: java program filename");
            System.exit(0);
        }

    }

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1  
This is totally incorrect. If an application is launched with no command line arguments, the main method will be called with an args array whose length is zero. –  Stephen C Oct 6 '10 at 3:17
    
@Stephen An array without any element inside, has zero length. Then what's wrong about my answer? –  Puspendu Banerjee Oct 27 '10 at 21:15
    
@Puspendu - what is wrong is that dummy[0] throws an array index out of bounds exception!! Ditto if you change the program (back) to testing args[0] and run it with no arguments. –  Stephen C Oct 27 '10 at 21:35
    
@Stephen I have not given any solution rather I tried to describe the issue. Read "If you don't pass any argument then even in that case args gets initialized but without any item/element. Try the following one, you will get the same effect:" –  Puspendu Banerjee Oct 28 '10 at 3:32
    
OK - I understand now. It would have helped if you hadn't mistyped your first sentence. As written it is unintelligible. I note that you quietly corrected it in your last comment. Sneaky. –  Stephen C Oct 28 '10 at 4:04

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