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Is there a easy way to determine the local min and maxes of an array of values. For example

Element Value   Note
1         1 
2         3 
3         5 
4         6 
5         7       max
5         5 
6         4       min
7         6 
8         9 
9         10      max
10        8 
11        7 
12        5      min
13        10    

so an array that is defined like:

let arr = [|1;3;5;6;7;5;4;6;9;10;8;7;5;10|]

would identify

mins  = [|4;5|]

and

maxs  = [|7;10|]

It could be a list or Sequence as well as an array. Two questions

  1. Is there any faciliities in F# that that lend themselves to this task
  2. Is there a common algorithm for determining either the mins or maxs or both?
  3. If writing from scratch should it be approached functionally or imperatively?

Thx

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You want to divide the array into strictly increasing runs? –  SLaks Oct 6 '10 at 1:55
    
How exactly do you define local max and min? –  casablanca Oct 6 '10 at 1:55
1  
@SLaks I think, he wants to find all numbers i for which 'a[i-1] > a[i] < a[i+1]' and call it mins. What I don't understand is where the problem. Just iterate through the numbers and compare. –  Nikita Rybak Oct 6 '10 at 1:57
    
+1 for interesting problem. –  Alexander Rautenberg Oct 6 '10 at 11:02
    
Dumb question I guess--why isn't mins = [|1;3|]? –  Onorio Catenacci Oct 6 '10 at 14:05

6 Answers 6

I think it'd be trivial to write

for x from 0 to size-2:
if (a[x] > a[x+1] && a[x+1] < a[x+2]) // also, there should be bound checking
    //a[x+1] is a min!
    minima.cram(x+1)
if (a[x] < a[x+1] && a[x+1] > a[x+2]) // also, there should be bound checking
    //a[x+1] is a max!
    maxima.cram(x+1)

Or have I oversimplified?

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Y - that simple, however as I am implementing in F# I am attempting to find a more functional approach. As far as imperative approach this is it... –  akaphenom Oct 6 '10 at 2:08

This looks like a job for... Seq.windowed! <cue superhero music>

let arr = [|1;3;5;6;7;5;4;6;9;10;8;7;5;10|] 

let _,mins,maxs = 
    arr |> Seq.windowed 3 |> Seq.fold (fun (i,mins,maxs) [|a;b;c|] -> 
    if a>b&&b<c then   (i+1, i::mins,    maxs)
    elif a<b&&b>c then (i+1,    mins, i::maxs)
    else               (i+1,    mins,    maxs)) (1,[],[])

arr |> Seq.iteri (fun i x -> printfn "%2d: %2d" i x)
printfn "mins %A" mins
printfn "maxs %A" maxs
(*
 0:  1
 1:  3
 2:  5
 3:  6
 4:  7
 5:  5
 6:  4
 7:  6
 8:  9
 9: 10
10:  8
11:  7
12:  5
13: 10
mins [12; 6]
maxs [9; 4]
*)
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I like the approach, not having to worry about navigating array indexes etc. the windowed function is an interesting - obviously I didn't think of using it in this problem, however I used it for calcing moving averages earlier today... –  akaphenom Oct 6 '10 at 2:19
    
I liked this answer so much I made an inefficient (but more me-readable) version! –  Massif Oct 6 '10 at 12:48
    
I am following up on old unanswered questions, the problem with this solution is it falls apart on duplicate values... –  akaphenom Nov 19 '10 at 19:22
    
I am unclear what you are saying, can you show a testcase that it fails on? (perhaps if you mean adjacent same values, just turn e.g. < to <= in the ifs?) –  Brian Nov 19 '10 at 19:28

If you're looking for a functional example, you could probably do (in Ruby)

def derivative_signs(list)
  (0..list.length-2).map { |i| (list[i+1] - list[i]) <=> 0 }
  ## <=> is the "rocketship" operator which is basically: be -1 if number is negative
  ##                                                      be 0 if number is zero
  ##                                                      be 1 if number is positive
  ## Alternatively, one could use x / x.abs, with an exception if x == 0
end

def derivative(list)
  (0..list.length-2).map { |i| list[i+1] - list[i] }
end

Coming from calculus, minimums/maximums are when the first derivative changes signs. So one could look through derivative_signs(arr) and find all of the sign changes.

first_derivative_signs = derivative_signs(arr)
# => [1, 1, 1, 1, -1, -1, 1, 1, 1, -1, -1, -1, 1]

Alternatively, you could also do

second_derivative = derivative(derivative_signs(arr))

On the list you provided, you'll get:

[0, 0, 0, -2, 0, 2, 0, 0, -2, 0, 0, 2]

It's clear to see that values with second derivative -2 are maximums, and values with second derivative 2 are minimums. The index of the second derivative is the index of the original list + 1. So the second_derivative[4] that is a -2 corresponds to arr[5] (7), which is a maximum.

Why do we do a "normal" derivative the second time, instead of a derivative_sign?

This is because when a value repeats twice in a row, you'll get unwanted behavior.

For example, consider

[1, 3, 6, 6, 7, 5, 4, 6, 9, 10, 8, 7, 5, 10]
# first_derivative_signs =>  [1, 1, 0, 1, -1, -1, 1, 1, 1, -1, -1, -1, 1]
# second_derivative_signs => [0, -1, 1, -1, 0, 1, 0, 0, -1, 0, 0, 1]
# second_derivative       => [0, -1, 1, -2, 0, 2, 0, 0, -2, 0, 0, 2]

Note that second_derivative_signs throws us some "false" minimums/maximums, while second_derivative, when we check for only -2 and 2, is good.

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Based on Brian's answer, I slightly prefer this version:

let arr = [|1;3;5;6;7;5;4;6;9;10;8;7;5;10|] 

let find_min_max input = 
    let windows = Seq.windowed 3 input 
    let mins = Seq.filter (fun [|a;b;c|] -> a>b && b<c) windows
               |> Seq.map (fun [|a;b;c|] -> b)
    let maxs = Seq.filter (fun [|a;b;c|] -> a<b && b>c) windows
               |> Seq.map (fun [|a;b;c|] -> b)

    mins, maxs


let mins, maxs = find_min_max arr 

printfn "mins %A" mins
printfn "maxs %A" maxs
share|improve this answer

Based on Massif's answer, which is based on Brian's answer, I'd problably roll the filter and map into one:

let find_min_max input =  
    let windows = Seq.windowed 3 input  
    let mins = Seq.choose (fun [|a;b;c|] -> if a>b && b<c then Some(b) else None) windows 
    let maxs = Seq.choose (fun [|a;b;c|] -> if a<b && b>c then Some(b) else None) windows 

    mins, maxs 

:)

share|improve this answer
    
I much prefer this version. –  Massif Oct 6 '10 at 14:28

I would use Seq.pairwise to get each number and its predecessor. Then you can calculate the difference between each number and its predecessor to get the difference between all values.

In the third step, you go over the differences and look for sign changes. When ever the sign changes, you know that the value before the sign change was an extremum (either min or max).

I don’t know F# at all, but the first step should look like this:

let diffs = Seq.pairwise arr |> Seq.map (-)
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