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I want to read 8byte chunks from a binary file at a time till I reach end of the file. Why doesn't this code work? What are the alternatives?

// read a file into memory
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main () {

  long long int * buffer;

  ifstream is;
  is.open ("test.txt", ios::binary );

  // allocate memory:
  buffer = new long long int;

  // read data:
  while(!is.eof())
      is.read (buffer,sizeof(long long int));
  is.close();


  delete[] buffer;
  return 0;
}

If I replace all long long int with char, the code works perfectly.

Ref: code adapted from www.cplusplus.com

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1  
What "doesn't work"? BTW, plain new does not match with delete []. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Oct 6 '10 at 2:36
    
@Nikolai: By "Doesn't work" I mean, it is not compiling. Its throwing errors. If what you say is true, the why would it work well (compile and run successfully) if I change all long long int to char. –  Sunil Oct 6 '10 at 2:47
2  
If you want to ask what those errors mean, it would be best to include them. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 2:49
4  
Mixing array-type new[]/delete[] operators with plain ones will compile, but will bring you into Undefined Behavior land, where anything is possible - the program might run fine, your hard-drive might blow up, or the mouse might eat your cat. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Oct 6 '10 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is !eof: it tells you whether the last operation hit eof, not whether the next will, and not whether the last failed!

Test the stream's truthiness itself (or use the fail method which is the same thing, negated), after doing the IO:

while (is.read(buffer, sizeof(long long int))) {
  // use buffer
}
assert(is.fail());  // must be true

Additionally, you don't have to use new at all:

long long buffer;
// ...
is.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&buffer), sizeof buffer)
  // the reinterpret_cast is needed in your original code too

Your source, cplusplus.com, also fails to check whether the read succeeded before using the data. In general, I find that site great for listing parameters, methods, etc. and horrible for most else.


Putting it all together, with some example output:

#include <climits>
#include <fstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>

int main () {
  using namespace std;

  ifstream in ("test.txt", in.binary);
  cout << hex << setfill('0');
  for (long long buffer;
       in.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&buffer), sizeof buffer);)
  {
    cout << setw(sizeof buffer * CHAR_BIT / 4) << buffer << '\n';
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even if I comment out the While statement it gives me an error. Actually, it should have read atleast one 8byte chunk, doesn't it? –  Sunil Oct 6 '10 at 2:44
2  
@Sunil: How do you expect anyone to help you with errors if you never say what they are? "Doctor, somethings not right with my arm." "Okay, what?" "Somethings wrong with it." –  GManNickG Oct 6 '10 at 2:53
    
@Roger: Thank you. Your code is working perfectly. That was what I was looking for. Can you explain a little about what (reinterpret_cast<char*>(&buffer), sizeof buffer) actually does. Is is possible to read more than 8 bytes (say user defined size) at a time too? –  Sunil Oct 6 '10 at 3:00
1  
@Sunil: Yes, it is possible to use any size that fits within memory and type limits. The cast is because istreams work with chars, not long longs. Because long long is a POD type, we can do the cast and write directly into the int. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 3:02
1  
@Sunil: 0x28000000 == 671088640; std::hex modifies an ostream to output in hexadecimal (base 16). I used it to modify how buffer is output in my sample. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 4:11

Another way to do the buffer allocation is with a union. This removes the need for casting.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    union
    {
        long long int n;
        char ch[sizeof(long long int)];
    } buffer;

    ifstream is("test.txt", ios::binary);

    while (is.read(buffer.ch,sizeof(buffer)))
        cout << buffer.n << '\n';

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not familiar with union so correct me if I'm wrong. Doesn't the size of buffer here be 16? size of the variable n + size of ch[8]. –  Sunil Oct 6 '10 at 3:15
    
@Sunil: Read up on unions, they're class-types but different from other classes. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 3:21
    
It's UB to read from a union member that wasn't the last one set, but yes, it works in practice. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 3:21
char buffer[8];
while (in.read(buffer,8)) {
    long long data = *(reinterpret_cast<long long*>(buffer));
    // process data
}

This is probably what you are looking for.

share|improve this answer
1  
Local char arrays are not guaranteed to be correctly aligned. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 2:56
    
As Roger and you say using reinterpret_cast works well but what would be the datatype of the buffer after this operation? –  Sunil Oct 6 '10 at 3:03
    
A union would be better than reinterpret_cast since it also guarantees alignment. –  Ben Voigt Oct 6 '10 at 3:12
    
@Sunil: The buffer variable doesn't change at all, but with the cast we are "viewing" it differently. (@Alexander: I notice now you should change 8 to sizeof(long long).) –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 3:13
    
@Ben: It's UB to read from a union member that wasn't the last one set, but yes, it works in practice. –  Roger Pate Oct 6 '10 at 3:13

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