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I know this is a stupid question, but still i have a doubt which needs to be cleared.

My question is why cannot we define a class as protected.

I know we cannot but why? There should be some specific reason.

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1  
What would it do if you declared a class protected? –  fennec Oct 6 '10 at 4:50
    
I think this is what you are looking for: stackoverflow.com/questions/2534733/java-protected-classes :D –  dewijones92 Mar 20 '13 at 10:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Because it makes no sense.

Protected class member (method or variable) is just like package-private (default visibility), except that it also can be accessed from subclasses.
Since there's no such concept as 'subpackage' or 'package-inheritance' in Java, declaring class protected or package-private would be the same thing.

You can declare nested and inner classes as protected or private, though.

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> Since there's no such concept as 'subpackage' or 'package-inheritance' in Java, declaring class protected or package-private would be the same thing. Why protected class would have same visibility as package-private? Isn't it the same as public? Thanks. –  yaromir Dec 1 '14 at 16:21
    
@Nikita Ryback Can you explain What is subPackage or package-inheritance?I am not still clear why protected is used in top level class.If you explain with example that will be great. –  App Kart Feb 13 at 4:17
    
When you declare class member as protected its visibility is classes at same package (called the package access) and the Subclassess. If you try to access from a outter class in other package this protected method member is not visible. –  kelgwiin Jun 17 at 13:59
public class A
{
    protected class B
    {
    }
}
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As you know default is for package level access and protected is for package level plus non-package classes but which extends this class(Point to be noted here is you can extend the class only if it is visible!). lets put it in this way:

  • protected top-level class would be visible to classes in its package.
  • now making it visible outside the package (subclasses ) is bit confusing and tricky. Which classes should be allowed to inherit our protected class?
  • If all the classes are allowed to subclass then it will be similar to public access specifier.
  • If none then it is similar to Default.

Since there is no way to restrict this class being subclassed by only few classes ( we cannot restrict class being inherited by only few classes out of all the available classes in a package/outsite of a package or do we??!!), there is no use of protected access specifiers for top level classes. Hence it is not allowed.

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"now making a protected class visible outside the package (subclasses ) is bit confusing and tricky. Which classes should be allowed to inherit our protected class? and If all the classes are allowed to subclass then it will be similar to public access specifier." really helped me understand the problem as to why protected classes don't make sense :) –  user1338998 Nov 4 '14 at 7:04

behavior of “protected” = behavior of “default”+ “use it in any subclass in any package”.

Anyway we have default access modifier for class, only advantage we can get from protected access modifier is:- by using it in any package through subclassing. But for subclass, visibility of parent “protected”class would be private. So it can’t be accessed. Basically if you have a protected top-level class, no outer class can gain access by subclassing it. So protected for a top-level class is meaningless.

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Protected is not similar to public. Protected has both package level access plus can be accessed outside of packages only by inheritance..If a class say A outside a package INHERITS a class from other package(with protected method by using INHERITANCE) it can access the methods of this class B which has protected methods but the sub-classes derived from this class i.e., A can't access the protected methods..the opposite happens with public..

Example:
package 2;
class B
{
protected void method1()
{
}
}
package 1;
import 2.B;
class A extends B
{
//can access protected method
}
class C extends A
{
//can't access the protected method
}
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