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I have a sliding panel set up on my website.

When it finished animating, I set the hash like so

function() {
   window.location.hash = id;
}

(this is a callback, and the id is assigned earlier).

This works good, to allow the user to bookmark the panel, and also for the non JavaScript version to work.

However, when I update the hash, the browser jumps to the location. I guess this is expected behaviour.

My question is: how can I prevent this? I.e. how can I change the window's hash, but not have the browser scroll to the element if the hash exists? Some sort of event.preventDefault() sort of thing?

I'm using jQuery 1.4 and the scrollTo plugin.

Many thanks!

Update

Here is the code that changes the panel.

$('#something a').click(function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    var link = $(this);
    var id = link[0].hash;

    $('#slider').scrollTo(id, 800, {
        onAfter: function() {

            link.parents('li').siblings().removeClass('active');
            link.parent().addClass('active');
            window.location.hash = id;

            }
    });
});
share|improve this question
    
I assume you've tried event.preventDefault() :) –  Marko Oct 6 '10 at 6:49
    
@Marko I don't know where to place it! –  alex Oct 6 '10 at 6:52
    
Can you post the rest of your code? –  Marko Oct 6 '10 at 6:53
    
@Marko Ivanovski I don't think it is relevant, but I'll see what I can do. –  alex Oct 6 '10 at 6:59
2  
@Gareth I don't think there is a place for it, because it happens as soon as I update the hash. –  alex Oct 6 '10 at 7:03

5 Answers 5

The problem is you are setting the window.location.hash to an element's ID attribute. It is the expected behavior for the browser to jump to that element, regardless of whether you "preventDefault()" or not.

One way to get around this is to prefix the hash with an arbitrary value like so:

window.location.hash = 'panel-' + id.replace('#', '');

Then, all you need to do is to check for the prefixed hash on page load. As an added bonus, you can even smooth scroll to it since you are now in control of the hash value...

$(function(){
    var h = window.location.hash.replace('panel-', '');
    if (h) {
        $('#slider').scrollTo(h, 800);
    }
});

If you need this to work at all times (and not just on the initial page load), you can use a function to monitor changes to the hash value and jump to the correct element on-the-fly:

var foundHash;
setInterval(function() {
    var h = window.location.hash.replace('panel-', '');
    if (h && h !== foundHash) {
        $('#slider').scrollTo(h, 800);
        foundHash = h;
    }
}, 100);
share|improve this answer

There is a workaround by using the history API on modern browsers with fallback on old ones:

if(history.pushState) {
    history.pushState(null, null, '#myhash');
}
else {
    location.hash = '#myhash';
}

Credit goes to Lea Verou

share|improve this answer
    
This is the better answer, in my opinion. –  Greg Annandale Jun 10 at 21:15
1  
Note that pushState has the side- (indented) effect of adding a state to the browser history stack. In other words, when the user clicks the back button, nothing will happen unless you also add a popstate event listener. –  David Cook Sep 2 at 2:42
1  
@DavidCook - We could also use history.replaceState (which, for hash changes, might make more sense) to avoid the need for a popstate event listener. –  Jack Pattishall Sep 6 at 0:38

Cheap and nasty solution.. Use the ugly #! style.

To set it:

window.location.hash = '#!' + id;

To read it:

id = window.location.hash.replace(/^#!/, '');

Since it doesn't match and anchor or id in the page, it won't jump.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I think yours is the most effective one :) –  Sisir Apr 9 at 11:57
    
I had to preserve compatibility with IE 7 and some mobile versions of the site. This solution was cleanest for me. Generally I'd be all over the pushState solutions. –  Eric Goodwin May 2 at 17:14

Why dont you get the current scroll position, put it in a variable then assign the hash and put the page scroll back to where it was:

var yScroll=document.body.scrollTop;
window.location.hash = id;
document.body.scrollTop=yScroll;

this should work

share|improve this answer
    
That's so crazy... it just might work. Update: It works! –  ANewcomer Sep 12 '12 at 14:02
1  
hm, this was working for me for awhile, but sometime in the last few months this has stopped working on firefox.... –  matchew May 28 '13 at 21:26
    
Better use window.scroll() to set it back... –  vsync Apr 2 at 14:55

I'm not sure if you can alter the original element but how about switch from using the id attr to something else like data-id? Then just read the value of data-id for your hash value and it won't jump.

share|improve this answer
1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Machavity Aug 22 at 16:13
    
If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context. –  Kyle Needham Aug 22 at 16:26

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