Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a solution to instantiate and return a Vector (or sth comparable) of classes.

My attempt looks like this (Heritage extends SuperClass):

public Vector<? extends SuperClass> getAssignableClasses()
{
Vector<? extends SuperClass> out = new Vector<SuperClass>();
out.add(Heritage.class); //does NOT work, IDE shows error message

return out;
}

The list's declaration seems to be erroneous. I suppose by this I can only add objects to a list, but how can I add classes using generics?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
2  
Somewhat off topic (hence a comment), but use ArrayList not Vector. Vector synchronizes its methods and is therefore a lot slower. There is virtually no reason to ever use Vector even in multithreaded code except for backwards compatibility. –  locka Oct 6 '10 at 9:01
    
I would go further: There is virtually no reason to ever use Vector. Ever. Nor Hashtable, Enumeration and a few other legacy classes. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 6 '10 at 9:14
add comment

6 Answers

I have not done this for a while, but isn't 'super' the keyword to use when you need to add stuff? :)

Here is a tutorial :)

share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is that there are no objects to be added but solely classes as it says "out.add(Heritage.class);" I'm looking for a way to create a list of classes –  Bernd Oct 6 '10 at 8:48
add comment

You are trying to add an instance of Class - that is, Heritage.class. Your Vector only allows subclasses of SuperClass.

You need to add a new Heritage() object, however you construct one of those.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The problem is, you are trying to add a class to the Vector (Heritage.class) instead of an object with the appropriate class. Something as follows should work:

public Vector<? extends SuperClass> getAssignableClasses()
{
  Vector<? extends SuperClass> out = new Vector<SuperClass>();
  out.add(new Heritage()); //this line is changed
                           //add appropriate constructor parameters as necessary
  return out;
}

Update I re-read your question. To return the concrete classes, you will need something as follows (I did not try this):

  public Vector<? extends SuperClass.class> getAssignableClasses()
  {
    Vector<? extends SuperClass> out = new Vector<SuperClass>();
    out.add(Heritage.class); //does NOT work, IDE shows error message
    return out;
  }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Or -as others have pointed out- you have to add an instance of Heritage: new Heritage()...

Or you have to declare correctly the Vector in order to store classes instead of instances:

Vector<Class<? extends SuperClass>>

Class<? extends SuperClass> means SuperClass.class or any descendant...

Important: Use List instead of Vector. It's the recomended list interface since Java 1.3 :)

Added: I've checked the code in your comment and it seems to compile ok:

import java.util.Vector;

public class SuperClass {
    public static void main() throws Exception {
        Vector<Class<? extends SuperClass>> vector = new Vector<Class<? extends SuperClass>>();
        vector.add(SuperClass.class);
        vector.add(Heritage.class);
    }

    public Vector<Class<? extends SuperClass>> getAssignableClasses() {
        Vector<Class<? extends SuperClass>> out = new Vector<Class<? extends SuperClass>>();
        out.add(Heritage.class);
        return out;
    }
}

class Heritage extends SuperClass {

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's what I just found out :-) But still the method signature seems to be wrong: public Vector<Class<? extends BasicComponent>> getAssignableClasses() { Vector<Class <? extends BasicComponent>> out =new Vector<Class <? extends BasicComponent>>(); out.add(ZahnradComponent.class); return out; } –  Bernd Oct 6 '10 at 8:59
    
You can use ArrayList as implementation (or LinkedList... but ArrayList will suffice most of the time). –  helios Oct 6 '10 at 9:01
add comment

Vector is an old, somewhat deprecated class. I'll use a generic list version instead:

public static List<Class<?>> getAssignableClasses(final Object o){
    final List<Class<?>> list;
    if(o == null){
        list = Collections.emptyList();
    } else{
        list = new ArrayList<Class<?>>();
        Class<?> tmp = o.getClass();
        do{
            list.add(tmp);
            tmp = tmp.getSuperclass();
        } while(tmp != null);
    }
    return list;
}

And as a bonus, here is a method that gathers all assignable interfaces based on the above method:

public static List<Class<?>> getAssignableInterfaces(final Object o){
    final List<Class<?>> result;
    final List<Class<?>> assignableClasses = getAssignableClasses(o);
    if(assignableClasses.isEmpty()){
        result = Collections.emptyList();
    } else{
        final Set<Class<?>> interfaces =
            new LinkedHashSet<Class<?>>(assignableClasses.size() * 2);
        for(final Class<?> clazz : assignableClasses){
            interfaces.addAll(Arrays.asList(clazz.getInterfaces()));
        }
        result = new ArrayList<Class<?>>(interfaces);
    }
    return result;
}

Test:

public static void main(final String[] args){
    final Map<String, String> map =
        new ConcurrentHashMap<String, String>();
    System.out.println(getAssignableClasses(map));
    System.out.println(getAssignableInterfaces(map));
}

Output:

[class java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap, class java.util.AbstractMap, class java.lang.Object]
[interface java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentMap, interface java.io.Serializable, interface java.util.Map]
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think the problem is that you tell java to make a vector with Objects of a type derived from Superclass. And then you add a class not an object. A dirty solution would be to make a vector of Class and test while adding if it's a subclass.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.