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Here's my code:

public class Sequence<T> {

    protected List<T> sequence = new ArrayList<T>();

    public Matrix<OrderedPair<T, ?>> createCartesianProduct(Sequence<?> secondSequence) {
    	Matrix<OrderedPair<T, ?>> result = new Matrix<OrderedPair<T, ?>>();
    	for (int rowIndex = 0; rowIndex < sequence.size(); rowIndex++) {
    		Sequence<OrderedPair<T, ?>> row = new Sequence<OrderedPair<T, ?>>();
    		for (int columnIndex = 0; columnIndex < secondSequence.length(); columnIndex++) {
    			row.add(new OrderedPair(sequence.get(rowIndex), secondSequence.sequence.get(columnIndex)));
    		}
    	}
    	return result;
    }
}

This compiles in Eclipse, but on the line within the inner for loop ( row.add(...) ) I get the following three warnings:

  • OrderedPair is a raw type. References to generic type OrderedPair()<T1, T2> should be parameterized.
  • Type Safety: The expression of type OrderedPair needs unchecked conversion to conform to OrderedPair<T, ?>
  • Type safety: The Constructor OrderedPair(Object, Object) belongs to the raw type OrderedPair. References to generic type OrderedPair<T1, T2> should be parameterized

I would like to use generics to enforce strong type-checking here, but I guess my understanding of generics is not sufficient to allow me to see how. Could someone educate me?

Thanks,

-- Ken

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ugh. This is why refied generics should've been no. 1 in devoxx. –  Ran Biron Dec 22 '08 at 20:47
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5 Answers

The constructor in the inner for loop should have generics:

row.add(new OrderedPair <T, ?> (sequence.get(rowIndex), secondSequence.sequence.get(columnIndex)));

But you can't use ? like this; so you'll need to replace all the ?s with a letter, say E. Then add an <E> into the signature, like this:

public <E> Matrix<OrderedPair<T, E>> createCartesianProduct(Sequence<E> secondSequence) {

Otherwise, the compiler won't know where the E came from.

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You definitely need to add the E there because you definitely need to enforce that the E in secondSequence and the E in the return are the same type. ? won't work because (1) you cannot instantiate an object with a ? type parameter, and (2) you cannot add any elements to an object with a ? type parameter (so the .add() would fail) because you cannot guarantee that the element is a subtype of "?" (some unknown type). So the E is definitely needed. –  newacct May 2 '09 at 6:06
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The OrderedPair is not generified but it's added to a list (Sequence) which is generified. You have to construct the OrderedPair with generics, e.g. do "new OrderedPair<...>(...)", to get rid of this warning.

Here I have added generics to the whole method, so the return type matches the secondSequence's type:

public <Z> Matrix<OrderedPair<T, Z>> createCartesianProduct(Sequence<Z> secondSequence) {
    Matrix<OrderedPair<T, Z>> result = new Matrix<OrderedPair<T, Z>>();
    for (int rowIndex = 0; rowIndex < sequence.size(); rowIndex++) {
        Sequence<OrderedPair<T, Z>> row = new Sequence<OrderedPair<T, Z>>();
        for (int columnIndex = 0; columnIndex < secondSequence.length(); columnIndex++) {
            addToRow(row, sequence.get(rowIndex), secondSequence.sequence.get(columnIndex));
        }
    }
    return result;
}

static <T, Z> void addToRow(Sequence<OrderedPair<T, Z>> seq, T t, Z z) {
    seq.add(new OrderedPair<T, Z>(t, z));
}
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I think that you are a bit confused here. In the type Sequence<T> what will be the T?

If you define a Sequence<OrderedPair<T, ?>> then you end up with recursion on T.

Please see if what you really need is something like this:

public class Sequence<T> {

    protected List<T> sequence = new ArrayList<T>();

    public <T2> Matrix<OrderedPair<T, T2>> createCartesianProduct(Sequence<T2> secondSequence) {
        Matrix<OrderedPair<T, T2>> result = new Matrix<OrderedPair<T, T2>>();
        for (int rowIndex = 0; rowIndex < sequence.size(); rowIndex++) {
                Sequence<T> row = new Sequence<T>();
                for (int columnIndex = 0; columnIndex < secondSequence.length(); columnIndex++) {
                        row.add(new OrderedPair<T, T2>(sequence.get(rowIndex), secondSequence.sequence.get(columnIndex)));
                }
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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Trust compiler and try to use generic parameters always when calling for OrderedPair :) It's not required but I think it's a good practice.

Strict generic applying in Java is not possible because of this:

Type erasure

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All you need to do is add a generic type to your constructor, like so:

row.add(new OrderedPair<T, ?>(sequence.get(rowIndex), secondSequence.sequence.get(columnIndex)));

The compiler is throwing errors since OrderedPair expects to receive types <T, ?> while you are passing them without any explicit type. The unchecked conversion the compiler is talking about is since basically you are giving the constructor <?, ?> while it wants <T, ?> hence the unchecked conversion that is going on, and which might throw an exception if the wrong type accidentally gets passed.

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