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I have the following object that has been created

@post = Post.create(:name => 'test', :post_number => 20, :active => true)

Once this is saved, I want to be able to get the object back to a hash, e.g. by doing somthing like:

@object.to_hash

How is this possible from within rails?

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8 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted

If you are looking for only attributes, then you can get them by:

@post.attributes
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1  
Don't use this when looping, Expensive method. Go with as_json –  AnkitG Jul 10 '13 at 8:07
    
@AnkitG I agree, but can you put up some benchmarks, that would be a good addition to the answer. –  Swanand Jul 11 '13 at 10:55
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In most recent version of Rails (can't tell which one exactly though), you could use the as_json method :

@post = Post.first
hash = @post.as_json
puts hash.pretty_inspect

Will output :

{ 
  :name => "test",
  :post_number => 20,
  :active => true
}

To go a bit further, you could override that method in order to customize the way your attributes appear, by doing something like this :

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  def as_json(*args)
    {
      :name => "My name is '#{self.name}'",
      :post_number => "Post ##{self.post_number}",
    }
  end
end

Then, with the same instance as above, will output :

{ 
  :name => "My name is 'test'",
  :post_number => "Post #20"
}

This of course means you have to explicitly specify which attributes must appear.

Hope this helps.

EDIT :

Also you can check the Hashifiable gem.

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not sure if that's what you need but try this in ruby console:

h = Hash.new
h["name"] = "test"
h["post_number"] = 20
h["active"] = true
h

obviously it will return you a hash in console. if you want to return a hash from within a method - instead of just "h" try using "return h.inspect", something similar to:

def wordcount(str)
  h = Hash.new()
  str.split.each do |key|
    if h[key] == nil
      h[key] = 1
    else
      h[key] = h[key] + 1
    end
  end
  return h.inspect
end
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Poster is asking about ActiveRecord models in Rails. –  Jeff Dec 31 '13 at 17:28
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You could definitely use the attributes to return all attributes but you could add an instance method to Post, call it "to_hash" and have it return the data you would like in a hash. Something like

def to_hash;
 {:name => self.name, :active => true}
end
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@object.as_json

as_json has very flexible way to configure complex object according to model relations

EXAMPLE

Model campaign belongs to shop and has one list

Model list has many list_tasks and each of list_tasks has many comments

We can get one json which combines all those data easily.

@campaign.as_json(
    {
        except: [:created_at, :updated_at],
        include: {
            shop: {
                except: [:created_at, :updated_at, :customer_id],
                include: {customer: {except: [:created_at, :updated_at]}}},
            list: {
                except: [:created_at, :updated_at, :observation_id],
                include: {
                    list_tasks: {
                        except: [:created_at, :updated_at],
                        include: {comments: {except: [:created_at, :updated_at]}}
                    }
                }
            },
        },
        methods: :tags
    })

Notice methods: :tags can help you attach any additional object which doesn't have relations with others. You just need to define a method with name tags in model campaign. This method should return whatever you need (e.g. Tags.all)

Official documentation for as_json

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There are some great suggestions here.

I think it's worth noting that you can treat an ActiveRecord model as a hash like so:

@customer = Customer.new( name: "John Jacob" )
@customer.name    # => "John Jacob"
@customer[:name]  # => "John Jacob"
@customer['name'] # => "John Jacob"

Therefore, instead of generating a hash of the attributes, you can use the object itself as a hash.

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Hash[post.attributes.map{|a| [a, post[a]]}]

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Swanand's answer is great.

if you are using FactoryGirl, you can use its build method to generate the attribute hash without the key id. e.g.

build(:post).attributes
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