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let's say I have a baseClass in myFramework namespace:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace myFramework
{
    public class baseClass
    {
        internal int m_value;

        internal int getValue() {
            return m_value;
        }

        internal void setValue(int value) {
            m_value = value;
        }

    }
}

In MyApplication namespace I inherit from it:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using myFramework;

namespace MyApplication
{
    class InheritedClass: baseClass
    {
    }
}

In a form in MyApplication namespace I use it:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using myFramework;

namespace MyApplication
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            InheritedClass inheritedClass = new InheritedClass();

            inheritedClass.setValue(10);
            textBox1.Text = inheritedClass.m_value.ToString();
        }
    }
}

As you can see I have declared m_value with internal modifier so that I can access it from Form.

Now what if I compile myFramework in a separate assembly ? internal won't work any more ? So is there any modifier I can use ? Protected can't even do less the job. Am I obliged to use public ?

Isn't there an access modifier that allows an object (form) which OWNS a class (inheritedclass) to access all the members of all class and parent class he owns like internal except that internal doesn't consider ownership but where the class has been declared ?

Update: of course in real world use, my base class has tight semantics with form (or view) so it's up to me to decide if I should do it, my question is not if I should do, my question is if it is possible or if I will be obliged to use stuff like Design by Contracts which I find silly to add yet another tool for such basic requirements.

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3 Answers

The form does not "own" the class, the form can be said to "own" an instance of that class, but even that is rather unclear; normally we use "own" to mean "has ultimate responsibility for", in the case where an object has to be disposed or otherwise "cleaned-up" at some point.

The form has absolutely nothing to do with the inner workings of baseClass. If form needs to access a member of baseClass, it should be public. Alternatively, if a member of baseClass should be private, internal, protected or protected internal, then the form has no business dealing with it.

If you are looking to give an unrelated class access to a deliberately non-public member, something has gone wrong in your design.

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In UML semantics yes ownership has some sense. As for "If form needs to access a member of baseClass, it should be public." no precisely because I don't want class that isn't of type form to access this baseclass. Once again syntax shouldn't obscure semantic needs. It's not because a language doesn't permit to express real world semantics that it is the right thing. It's just past inheritance and lack of evolution. –  user310291 Oct 6 '10 at 17:36
    
So sure if I do this it is in the case my base class is clearly not unrelated to form if this base class will for example implements some Interfaces I will create to be only for form that I would enrich with my own semantics. –  user310291 Oct 6 '10 at 17:38
    
If form has some special two-way relationship to baseClass, of the sort where a friend keyword would be used in some other languages then the best we can do is use the InternalsVisibleTo attribute, but alas that also makes them visible to the rest of the assembly that form is in. If baseClass implements interfaces only used by form, then you could just put the method in one of those interfaces. From the example though, there's nothing to see about form that makes it different to any other class that uses baseClass. –  Jon Hanna Oct 6 '10 at 18:40
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"Ownership" has no meaning here, these are completely unrelated classes. At best you could jump through the InternalsVisibleTo attribute hoop.

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I mean composition. –  user310291 Oct 6 '10 at 17:31
    
Thanks this attribute is interesting but in the case of a framework that should be visible to unknown future clients I can't see how I could use it ? –  user310291 Oct 6 '10 at 17:32
    
Maybe there is a way to register such clients at runtime ? –  user310291 Oct 6 '10 at 17:43
    
Accessibility is a compile time feature. Using reflection to work around it is a pretty ugly hack. –  Hans Passant Oct 6 '10 at 17:53
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Based on the example shown, a public property would do exactly what you need. However, if you want to keep the member hidden (and you know ahead of time exactly which assemblies will need access to it), the InternalsVisibleToAttribute will do the trick.

I use this in instances where I do not want a property to be exposed, but I need access to it for testing. In this case, I know precisely that I only want my test assembly to have access to the property and I have control over how it is used.

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InternalsVisibleToAttribute would be good except that my baseclass will be in a framework which doesn't know in advance which assembly will be the clients. Maybe there is a way to register such clients at runtime ? –  user310291 Oct 6 '10 at 17:43
    
I am not aware of a way to do so. The attribute is applied to the assembly.cs file, so it has to be set at compile-time. It sounds like a public property is the way you want to go; is there a reason you are hesitant to do so? Properties are intended to give access to things that have references to instances of the class, which is exactly what you have. –  Mark Avenius Oct 6 '10 at 18:03
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