Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm always surprised that even after using C# for all this time now, I still manage to find things I didn't know about...

I've tried searching the internet for this, but using the "~" in a search isn't working for me so well and I didn't find anything on MSDN either (not to say it isn't there)

I saw this snippet of code recently, what does the tilde(~) mean?

/// <summary>
/// Enumerates the ways a customer may purchase goods.
/// </summary>
[Flags]
public enum PurchaseMethod
{   
    All = ~0,
    None =  0,
    Cash =  1,
    Check =  2,
    CreditCard =  4
}

I was a little surprised to see it so I tried to compile it, and it worked... but I still don't know what it means/does. Any help??

share|improve this question
3  
This is an awesome and elegant solution allowing for smooth upgrading of the enum over time. Unfortunately it conflicts with CA-2217 and will throw an error if you use the code analysis :( msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182335.aspx – Jason Coyne Sep 13 '12 at 14:49
up vote 111 down vote accepted

~ is the unary one's complement operator -- it flips the bits of its operand.

~0 = 0xFFFFFFFF = -1

in two's complement arithmetic, ~x == -x-1

the ~ operator can be found in pretty much any language that borrowed syntax from C, including Objective-C/C++/C#/Java/Javascript.

share|improve this answer
    
That's cool. I didn't realise you could do that in an enum. Will definitely use in future – Orion Edwards Dec 22 '08 at 23:31
    
So it's the equivalent of All = Int32.MaxValue? Or UInt32.MaxValue? – Joel Mueller Dec 23 '08 at 18:52
1  
All = (unsigned int)-1 == UInt32.MaxValue. Int32.MaxValue has no relevance. – Jimmy Dec 23 '08 at 20:00
4  
@Stevo3000: Int32.MinValue is 0xF0000000, which is not ~0 (it's actually ~Int32.MaxValue) – Jimmy Apr 25 '09 at 0:38
1  
@Jimmy: Int32.MinValue is 0x80000000. It has only a single bit set (not the four that F would give you). – ILMTitan Apr 26 '13 at 21:14

I'd think that:

[Flags]
public enum PurchaseMethod
{
    None = 0,
    Cash = 1,
    Check = 2,
    CreditCard = 4,
    All = Cash | Check | CreditCard
 }

Would be a bit more clear.

share|improve this answer
8  
It certainly is. The only good effect of the unary is that if someone adds to the enumeration, All automagically includes it. Still, the benefit doesn't outweigh the lack of clarity. – ctacke Dec 22 '08 at 21:47
10  
I don't see how that's more clear. It adds either redundancy or ambiguity: does "All" mean "exactly the set of these 3" or "everything in this enum"? If I add a new value, should I also add it to All? If I see somebody else hasn't added a new value to All, is that intentional? ~0 is explicit. – Ken Apr 2 '09 at 18:46
12  
Personal preference aside, if the meaning of ~0 was as clear to the OP as it is to you and I, he never would have posed this question in the first place. I'm not sure what that says about the clarity of one approach versus the other. – Sean Bright Apr 2 '09 at 19:36
8  
Since some programmers that use C# might not yet know what << means, should we code around that, too, for more clarity? I think not. – InsidiousForce Sep 18 '12 at 22:10
3  
@Paul, that's kind of crazy. Let's stop using ; in English because many people don't understand its use. Or all those words they don't know. Wow, such a small set of operators, and we should dumb down our code for the people that don't know what bits are and how to manipulate them? – InsidiousForce Jan 4 '14 at 4:39
public enum PurchaseMethod
{   
    All = ~0, // all bits of All are 1. the ~ operator just inverts bits
    None =  0,
    Cash =  1,
    Check =  2,
    CreditCard =  4
}

Because of two complement in C#, ~0 == -1, the number where all bits are 1 in the binary representation.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like they are creating a bit flag for the payment method: 000 = None; 001 = Cash; 010 = Check; 100 = Credit Card; 111 = All – Dillie-O Dec 22 '08 at 21:44
    
It's not two's complement, that's invert all the bits and add one, so that the two's complement of 0 is still 0. The ~0 simply inverts all the bits or one's complement. – Bearddo Dec 22 '08 at 22:45
    
No, two's complement is simply inverting all the bits. – configurator Dec 22 '08 at 22:57
2  
@configurator -- that's not correct. The ones complement is a simple inversion of bits. – Dave Markle Dec 22 '08 at 23:06
    
c# uses two complement to represent negative values. of course ~ is not two complement, but simply inverts all bits. i'm not sure where you got that from, Beardo – Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '08 at 23:49

Its better than the

All = Cash | Check | CreditCard

solution, because if you add another method later, say:

PayPal = 8 ,

you will be already done with the tilde-All, but have to change the all-line with the other. So its less error-prone later.

regards

share|improve this answer
    
It's better if you also say why it's less error-prone. Like: if you store the value in a database/binary file and then add another flag to the enumeration, it'd be included in the 'All' which means that 'All' will always mean all, and not just as long as the flags are the same :). – Aidiakapi Apr 19 '12 at 15:41

Just a side note, when you use

All = Cash | Check | CreditCard

you have the added benefit that Cash | Check | CreditCard would evaluate to All and not to another value (-1) that is not equal to all while containing all values. For example, if you use three check boxes in the UI

[] Cash
[] Check
[] CreditCard

and sum their values, and the user selects them all, you would see All in the resulting enum.

share|improve this answer
    
That's why you use myEnum.HasFlag() instead :D – Pyritie Nov 7 '12 at 14:36
    
@Pyritie: How does your comment have anything to do with what I said? – configurator Nov 7 '12 at 18:51
    
as in... if you used ~0 for "All", you could do something like All.HasFlag(Cash | Check | CreditCard) and that would evaulate to true. Would be a workaround since == doesn't always work with ~0. – Pyritie Nov 15 '12 at 12:13
    
Oh, I was talking about what you see in the debugger and with ToString - not about using == All. – configurator Nov 15 '12 at 16:34

For others who found this question illuminating, I have a quick ~ example to share. The following snippet from the implementation of a paint method, as detailed in this Mono documentation, uses ~ to great effect:

PaintCells (clipBounds, 
    DataGridViewPaintParts.All & ~DataGridViewPaintParts.SelectionBackground);

Without the ~ operator, the code would probably look something like this:

PaintCells (clipBounds, DataGridViewPaintParts.Background 
    | DataGridViewPaintParts.Border
    | DataGridViewPaintParts.ContentBackground
    | DataGridViewPaintParts.ContentForeground
    | DataGridViewPaintParts.ErrorIcon
    | DataGridViewPaintParts.Focus);

... because the enumeration looks like this:

public enum DataGridViewPaintParts
{
    None = 0,
    Background = 1,
    Border = 2,
    ContentBackground = 4,
    ContentForeground = 8,
    ErrorIcon = 16,
    Focus = 32,
    SelectionBackground = 64,
    All = 127 // which is equal to Background | Border | ... | Focus
}

Notice this enum's similarity to Sean Bright's answer?

I think the most important take away for me is that ~ is the same operator in an enum as it is in a normal line of code.

share|improve this answer
    
In your second code block, shouldn't the &s be |s? – ClickRick Dec 20 '14 at 11:19
    
@ClickRick, thanks for the catch. The second code block actually makes sense now. – Mike Dec 22 '14 at 3:34

It's a complement operator, Here is an article i often refer to for bitwise operators

http://www.blackwasp.co.uk/CSharpLogicalBitwiseOps.aspx

Also msdn uses it in their enums article which demonstrates it use better

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc138362.aspx

share|improve this answer

The alternative I personally use, which does the same thing than @Sean Bright's answer but looks better to me, is this one:

[Flags]
public enum PurchaseMethod
{
    None = 0,
    Cash = 1,
    Check = 2,
    CreditCard = 4,
    PayPal = 8,
    BitCoin = 16,
    All = Cash + Check + CreditCard + PayPal + BitCoin
}

Notice how the binary nature of those numbers, which are all powers of two, makes the following assertion true: (a + b + c) == (a | b | c). And IMHO, + looks better.

share|improve this answer

I have done some experimenting with the ~ and find it that it could have pitfalls. Consider this snippet for LINQPad which shows that the All enum value does not behave as expected when all values are ored together.

void Main()
{
    StatusFilterEnum x = StatusFilterEnum.Standard | StatusFilterEnum.Saved;
    bool isAll = (x & StatusFilterEnum.All) == StatusFilterEnum.All;
    //isAll is false but the naive user would expect true
    isAll.Dump();
}
[Flags]
public enum StatusFilterEnum {
      Standard =0,
      Saved =1,   
      All = ~0 
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.