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Can someone point towards (or show) some good general floating point comparison functions in C# for comparing floating point values? I want to implement functions for IsEqual, IsGreater an IsLess. I also only really care about doubles not floats.

EDIT: I removed the original code since it was complete junk. See the accepted answer.

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1  
What is your question, exactly? – NullUserException Oct 6 '10 at 16:16
    
Can someone point towards (or show) some good general floating point comparison functions in C# for comparing floating point values? The problem is a lot of people have shown partial answers. I'm looking for something more complete. – Kevin Gale Oct 6 '10 at 16:18
2  
This is dangerous, it pretends there's a meaningful result when the numbers get meaningless. Pay attention to Philip's post. – Hans Passant Oct 6 '10 at 18:05
    
@Hans Passant - I don't see how Philip's post helps. I'm not claiming this function I found is good or correct I'm looking for help on that front. – Kevin Gale Oct 6 '10 at 18:19
    
@NullUserException - Thanks for adding the c# tag. Don't know how I missed that. – Kevin Gale Oct 6 '10 at 18:21

10 Answers 10

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Writing a useful general-purpose floating point IsEqual is very, very hard, if not outright impossible. Your current code will fail badly for a==0. How the method should behave for such cases is really a matter of definition, and arguably the code would best be tailored for the specific domain use case.

For this kind of thing, you really, really need a good test suite. That's how I did it for The Floating-Point Guide, this is what I came up with in the end (Java code, should be easy enough to translate):

    public static boolean nearlyEqual(float a, float b, float epsilon) {
        final float absA = Math.abs(a);
        final float absB = Math.abs(b);
        final float diff = Math.abs(a - b);

        if (a == b) { // shortcut, handles infinities
            return true;
        } else if (a == 0 || b == 0 || diff < Float.MIN_NORMAL) {
            // a or b is zero or both are extremely close to it
            // relative error is less meaningful here
            return diff < (epsilon * Float.MIN_NORMAL);
        } else { // use relative error
            return diff / (absA + absB) < epsilon;
        }
    }

You can also find the test suite on the site.

Appendix: Same code in c# for doubles (as asked in questions)

public bool NearlyEqual(double a, double b, double epsilon)
{
    double absA = Math.Abs(a);
    double absB = Math.Abs(b);
    double diff = Math.Abs(a - b);

    if (a == b)
    { // shortcut, handles infinities
        return true;
    } 
    else if (a == 0 || b == 0 || diff < Double.Epsilon) 
    {
        // a or b is zero or both are extremely close to it
        // relative error is less meaningful here
        return diff < epsilon;
    }
    else
    { // use relative error
        return diff / (absA + absB) < epsilon;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This isn't my code actually just something I found and I could see problems with it and I hoped that would spur someone to answer my question. Do you have any input or examples for IsLess and IsGreater functions? – Kevin Gale Oct 6 '10 at 18:41
    
@Kevin: no, but it's not all that difficult to come up with test cases yourself. It's an almost perfect example for unit testing and a test-first approach: any change that makes one case work has a very high chance to break another. Without a test suite, it's nearly impossible to get all cases to work at the same time. – Michael Borgwardt Oct 6 '10 at 18:59
    
@MichaelBorgwardt Fantastic guide! For your unit tests I see that you are using the default epsilon of 0.000001f. What would you recommend for performing the same unit tests with double precision? – Lea Hayes Feb 13 '13 at 3:53
    
Also, would you mind explaining the test case assertTrue(nearlyEqual(1e10f * Float.MIN_VALUE, -1e10f * Float.MIN_VALUE)); because this one I cannot grasp for some reason... – Lea Hayes Feb 13 '13 at 4:02
    
This always seems to fail for me when implemented in C#... diff / (absA + absB) is 2 and epsilon is 0.000001f. – Lea Hayes Feb 13 '13 at 6:19

I think your second option is the best bet. Generally in floating-point comparison you often only care that one value is within a certain tolerance of another value, controlled by the selection of epsilon.

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Although the second option is more general, the first option is better when you have an absolute tolerance, and when you have to execute many of these comparisons. If this comparison is say for every pixel in an image, the multiplication in the second options might slow your execution to unacceptable levels of performance.

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Peformance isn't a big issue for my applications I'm more concerned with correctness. – Kevin Gale Oct 6 '10 at 16:39
1  
You need to fight your premature optimization instincts harder. Make it work correctly first, only then start even thinking about making it fast (if it's even an issue at all). – Michael Borgwardt Oct 6 '10 at 18:18

What about: b - delta < a && a < b + delta

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From Bruce Dawson's paper on comparing floats, you can also compare floats as integers. Closeness is determined by least significant bits.

public static bool AlmostEqual2sComplement( float a, float b, int maxDeltaBits ) 
{
    int aInt = BitConverter.ToInt32( BitConverter.GetBytes( a ), 0 );
    if ( aInt <  0 )
        aInt = Int32.MinValue - aInt;  // Int32.MinValue = 0x80000000

    int bInt = BitConverter.ToInt32( BitConverter.GetBytes( b ), 0 );
    if ( bInt < 0 )
        bInt = Int32.MinValue - bInt;

    int intDiff = Math.Abs( aInt - bInt );
    return intDiff <= ( 1 << maxDeltaBits );
}

EDIT: BitConverter is relatively slow. If you're willing to use unsafe code, then here is a very fast version:

    public static unsafe int FloatToInt32Bits( float f )
    {
        return *( (int*)&f );
    }

    public static bool AlmostEqual2sComplement( float a, float b, int maxDeltaBits )
    {
        int aInt = FloatToInt32Bits( a );
        if ( aInt < 0 )
            aInt = Int32.MinValue - aInt;

        int bInt = FloatToInt32Bits( b );
        if ( bInt < 0 )
            bInt = Int32.MinValue - bInt;

        int intDiff = Math.Abs( aInt - bInt );
        return intDiff <= ( 1 << maxDeltaBits );
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I come across a few references that seem to say this may be the best way to do it (comparing as an integer type). Michael Borgwardt above also links to Dawson's paper. I wonder if the bit converting is very expensive? – Kevin Gale Oct 7 '10 at 14:30
    
BitConverter is slow. I've added a much faster version, but it uses unsafe code. – Andrew Wang Oct 8 '10 at 7:24
    
Thanks I'll consider it and it will be useful to others who find this question. – Kevin Gale Oct 8 '10 at 14:10
1  
Is there a way to convert an absolute error from float into maxDeltaBits so that this function works similar (but more accurate of course) to abs(a - b) < delta? I like the idea of this approach, but I would prefer a function where I can specify a maximum absolute error. – Lea Hayes Feb 14 '13 at 4:08

Further to Andrew Wang's answer: if the BitConverter method is too slow but you cannot use unsafe code in your project, this struct is ~6x quicker than BitConverter:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct FloatToIntSafeBitConverter
{
    public static int Convert(float value)
    {
        return new FloatToIntSafeBitConverter(value).IntValue;
    }

    public FloatToIntSafeBitConverter(float floatValue): this()
    {
        FloatValue = floatValue;
    }

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public readonly int IntValue;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public readonly float FloatValue;
}

(Incidentally, I tried using the accepted solution but it (well my conversion at least) failed some of the unit tests also mentioned in the answer. e.g. assertTrue(nearlyEqual(Float.MIN_VALUE, -Float.MIN_VALUE)); )

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I found that those unit tests failed, did you ever find out why? – Lea Hayes Feb 13 '13 at 4:22

Here is a much-expanded version of Simon Hewitt's class:

/// <summary>
/// Safely converts a <see cref="float"/> to an <see cref="int"/> for floating-point comparisons.
/// </summary>
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct FloatToInt : IEquatable<FloatToInt>, IEquatable<float>, IEquatable<int>, IComparable<FloatToInt>, IComparable<float>, IComparable<int>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FloatToInt"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="floatValue">The <see cref="float"/> value to be converted to an <see cref="int"/>.</param>
    public FloatToInt(float floatValue)
        : this()
    {
        FloatValue = floatValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the floating-point value as an integer.
    /// </summary>
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public readonly int IntValue;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the floating-point value.
    /// </summary>
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public readonly float FloatValue;

    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates whether the current object is equal to another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the current object is equal to the <paramref name="other"/> parameter; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    public bool Equals(FloatToInt other)
    {
        return other.IntValue == IntValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates whether the current object is equal to another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the current object is equal to the <paramref name="other"/> parameter; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    public bool Equals(float other)
    {
        return IntValue == new FloatToInt(other).IntValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates whether the current object is equal to another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the current object is equal to the <paramref name="other"/> parameter; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    public bool Equals(int other)
    {
        return IntValue == other;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Compares the current object with another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A value that indicates the relative order of the objects being compared. The return value has the following meanings: Value Meaning Less than zero This object is less than the <paramref name="other"/> parameter.Zero This object is equal to <paramref name="other"/>. Greater than zero This object is greater than <paramref name="other"/>. 
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    public int CompareTo(FloatToInt other)
    {
        return IntValue.CompareTo(other.IntValue);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Compares the current object with another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A value that indicates the relative order of the objects being compared. The return value has the following meanings: Value Meaning Less than zero This object is less than the <paramref name="other"/> parameter.Zero This object is equal to <paramref name="other"/>. Greater than zero This object is greater than <paramref name="other"/>. 
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    public int CompareTo(float other)
    {
        return IntValue.CompareTo(new FloatToInt(other).IntValue);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Compares the current object with another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A value that indicates the relative order of the objects being compared. The return value has the following meanings: Value Meaning Less than zero This object is less than the <paramref name="other"/> parameter.Zero This object is equal to <paramref name="other"/>. Greater than zero This object is greater than <paramref name="other"/>. 
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    public int CompareTo(int other)
    {
        return IntValue.CompareTo(other);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates whether this instance and a specified object are equal.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if <paramref name="obj"/> and this instance are the same type and represent the same value; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="obj">Another object to compare to. </param><filterpriority>2</filterpriority>
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj))
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (obj.GetType() != typeof(FloatToInt))
        {
            return false;
        }
        return Equals((FloatToInt)obj);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the hash code for this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A 32-bit signed integer that is the hash code for this instance.
    /// </returns>
    /// <filterpriority>2</filterpriority>
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return IntValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Implicitly converts from a <see cref="FloatToInt"/> to an <see cref="int"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">A <see cref="FloatToInt"/>.</param>
    /// <returns>An integer representation of the floating-point value.</returns>
    public static implicit operator int(FloatToInt value)
    {
        return value.IntValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Implicitly converts from a <see cref="FloatToInt"/> to a <see cref="float"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">A <see cref="FloatToInt"/>.</param>
    /// <returns>The floating-point value.</returns>
    public static implicit operator float(FloatToInt value)
    {
        return value.FloatValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if two <see cref="FloatToInt"/> instances have the same integer representation.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="left">A <see cref="FloatToInt"/>.</param>
    /// <param name="right">A <see cref="FloatToInt"/>.</param>
    /// <returns>true if the two <see cref="FloatToInt"/> have the same integer representation; otherwise, false.</returns>
    public static bool operator ==(FloatToInt left, FloatToInt right)
    {
        return left.IntValue == right.IntValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if two <see cref="FloatToInt"/> instances have different integer representations.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="left">A <see cref="FloatToInt"/>.</param>
    /// <param name="right">A <see cref="FloatToInt"/>.</param>
    /// <returns>true if the two <see cref="FloatToInt"/> have different integer representations; otherwise, false.</returns>
    public static bool operator !=(FloatToInt left, FloatToInt right)
    {
        return !(left == right);
    }
}
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Here's how I solved it, with nullable double extension method.

    public static bool NearlyEquals(this double? value1, double? value2, double unimportantDifference = 0.0001)
    {
        if (value1 != value2)
        {
            if(value1 == null || value2 == null)
                return false;

            return Math.Abs(value1.Value - value2.Value) < unimportantDifference;
        }

        return true;
    }

...

        double? value1 = 100;
        value1.NearlyEquals(100.01); // will return false
        value1.NearlyEquals(100.000001); // will return true
        value1.NearlyEquals(100.01, 0.1); // will return true
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I translated the sample from Michael Borgwardt. This is the result:

public static bool NearlyEqual(float a, float b, float epsilon){
    float absA = Math.Abs (a);
    float absB = Math.Abs (b);
    float diff = Math.Abs (a - b);

    if (a == b) {
        return true;
    } else if (a == 0 || b == 0 || diff < float.Epsilon) {
        // a or b is zero or both are extremely close to it
        // relative error is less meaningful here
        return diff < epsilon;
    } else { // use relative error
        return diff / (absA + absB) < epsilon;
    }
}

Feel free to improve this answer.

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1  
This code is incorrect, float.MinValue is the minimum value which can be represented by the float datatype, not the smallest positive value which can be represented by float. – Brian Fairservice Nov 12 '15 at 19:02
    
Thank you for that important note! I should think more thoroughly before posting ... – testing Nov 13 '15 at 8:37

Be careful with some answers...

1 - You could easily represent any number with 15 significatives digits in memory with a double. See Wikipedia.

2 - The problem come from calculation of floating numbers where you could loose some precision. I mean that a number like .1 could become something like .1000000000000001 ==> after calculation. When you do some calculation, results could be truncated in order to be represented in a double. That truncation brings the error you could get.

3 - To prevent the problem when comparing double values, people introduce an error margin often called epsilon. If 2 floating numbers only have a contextual epsilon ha difference, then they are considered equals. Epsilon is never double.Epsilon.

4 - The epsilon is never double.epsilon. It is always bigger than that. Many peoples think that it is double.Epsilon but they are really wrong. To have a great answer please see: Hans Passant answer. The epsilon is based on your context where it depends on the biggest number you reach during your calculation and on the number of calculation you are doing (truncation error accumulate). Epsilon is the smallest number you could represent into your context with 15 digits.

5 - This is the code that I use. Be careful that I use my epsilon only for few calculations. Otherwise I multiply my epsilon by 10 or 100.

public static class DoubleExtension
    {
        // ******************************************************************
        // Base on Hans Passant Answer on:
        // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2411392/double-epsilon-for-equality-greater-than-less-than-less-than-or-equal-to-gre

        /// <summary>
        /// Compare two double taking in account the double precision potential error.
        /// Take care: truncation errors accumulate on calculation. More you do, more you should increase the epsilon.
        public static bool AboutEquals(this double value1, double value2)
        {
            double epsilon = Math.Max(Math.Abs(value1), Math.Abs(value2)) * 1E-15;
            return Math.Abs(value1 - value2) <= epsilon;
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        // Base on Hans Passant Answer on:
        // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2411392/double-epsilon-for-equality-greater-than-less-than-less-than-or-equal-to-gre

        /// <summary>
        /// Compare two double taking in account the double precision potential error.
        /// Take care: truncation errors accumulate on calculation. More you do, more you should increase the epsilon.
        /// You get really better performance when you can determine the contextual epsilon first.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="value1"></param>
        /// <param name="value2"></param>
        /// <param name="precalculatedContextualEpsilon"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public static bool AboutEquals(this double value1, double value2, double precalculatedContextualEpsilon)
        {
            return Math.Abs(value1 - value2) <= precalculatedContextualEpsilon;
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        public static double GetContextualEpsilon(this double biggestPossibleContextualValue)
        {
            return biggestPossibleContextualValue * 1E-15;
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        /// <summary>
        /// Mathlab equivalent
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="dividend"></param>
        /// <param name="divisor"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public static double Mod(this double dividend, double divisor)
        {
            return dividend - System.Math.Floor(dividend / divisor) * divisor;
        }

        // ******************************************************************
    }
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