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What does the following exception mean; how can I fix it?

This is the code:

Toast toast = Toast.makeText(mContext, "Something", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);

This is the exception:

java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't create handler inside thread that has not called Looper.prepare()
     at android.os.Handler.<init>(Handler.java:121)
     at android.widget.Toast.<init>(Toast.java:68)
     at android.widget.Toast.makeText(Toast.java:231)
share|improve this question
    
check this library compile 'com.shamanland:xdroid-toaster:0.0.5', it doesn't require runOnUiThread() or Context variable, all routine is gone! just invoke Toaster.toast(R.string.my_msg); here is the example: github.com/shamanland/xdroid-toaster-example –  Oleksii Kropachov Jul 17 at 10:13
    
What a stupid error message! It could've been as simple as - can't call this from a non-UI thread as done when views are touched from a non-UI thread. –  Dheeraj Bhaskar Aug 25 at 15:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 132 down vote accepted

You're calling it from a worker thread. You need to call Toast.makeText() (and most other functions dealing with the UI) from within the main thread. You could use a handler, for example.

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10  
Google does: developer.android.com/guide/appendix/faq/commontasks.html . Search for "AlertDialog". –  EboMike Jan 23 '11 at 8:04
3  
@aloneguid: The answer clearly addresses the original question. And the example code clearly demonstrates how to fix it (even though it uses an AlertDialog rather than a Toast). What's your problem? Why the downvote? –  EboMike Jul 5 '11 at 18:33
121  
The downvote would be because your answer is too ambiguous. Rather than providing a link which contains a lot of unrelated information, it would be much more helpful to provide a direct link to code showing how to use a handler as you propose. Or better yet, include sample code in your answer. –  Cleggy Nov 10 '11 at 0:32
2  
Just adding my two cents to what Cleggy said. It would be preferable to provide a brief demonstration of what you mean (however contrived), as a coded example can often speak volumes for itself. –  cdata Mar 1 '13 at 22:55
2  
for a full technical answer see this prasanta-paul.blogspot.kr/2013/09/… –  tony9099 Sep 26 '13 at 7:50

You need to call Toast.makeText(...) from the UI thread:

activity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    Toast.makeText(activity, "Hello", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
  }
});

This is copy-pasted from another (duplicate) SO answer.

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2  
Dude you're awesome! –  Luke Taylor Jun 16 '12 at 11:30
5  
It helped someone too! –  Eamorr Jul 6 '12 at 11:45
3  
Mind blowing and very very Helpful –  Mikin Patel Apr 8 '13 at 10:13
1  
2 years later and that answer still helping people. Thanks men! –  Misters Sep 26 '13 at 13:35
1  
Great answer. This had me confused for a while. Just to note, I did not need the activity. before runOnUiThread. –  Cen92 May 11 at 12:24

I know I am a little late but here goes. Android basically works on two thread types namely UI thread and background thread. According to android documentation -

Do not access the Android UI toolkit from outside the UI thread to fix this problem, Android offers several ways to access the UI thread from other threads. Here is a list of methods that can help:

Activity.runOnUiThread(Runnable)  
View.post(Runnable)  
View.postDelayed(Runnable, long)

Now there are various methods to solve this problem. I will explain it by code sample

runOnUiThread

new Thread()
{
    public void run()
    {
        myactivity.this.runOnUiThread(new runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                //Do your UI operations like dialog opening or Toast here
            }
        });
    }
}.start();

LOOPER

Class used to run a message loop for a thread. Threads by default do not have a message loop associated with them; to create one, call prepare() in the thread that is to run the loop, and then loop() to have it process messages until the loop is stopped.

class LooperThread extends Thread {
    public Handler mHandler;

    public void run() {
        Looper.prepare();

        mHandler = new Handler() {
            public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
                // process incoming messages here
            }
        };

        Looper.loop();
    }
}

AsyncTask

AsyncTask allows you to perform asynchronous work on your user interface. It performs the blocking operations in a worker thread and then publishes the results on the UI thread, without requiring you to handle threads and/or handlers yourself.

public void onClick(View v) {
    new CustomTask().execute((Void[])null);
}


private class CustomTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {

    protected Void doInBackground(Void... param) {
        //Do some work
        return null;
    }

    protected void onPostExecute(Void param) {
        //Print Toast or open dialog
    }
}

Handler

A Handler allows you to send and process Message and Runnable objects associated with a thread's MessageQueue.

Message msg = new Message();


new Thread()
{
    public void run()
    {
        msg.arg1=1;
        handler.sendMessage(msg);
    }
}.start();



Handler handler = new Handler(new Handler.Callback() {

    @Override
    public boolean handleMessage(Message msg) {
        if(msg.arg1==1)
        {
            //Print Toast or open dialog        
        }
        return false;
    }
});
share|improve this answer
14  
VERY comprehensive answer. +1 –  JRun Aug 2 '13 at 11:56
1  
This is exactly what I was looking for. Especially the first example with runOnUiThread –  Navin Nov 3 '13 at 2:19
1  
Guys its the best answer I was looking for. I will keep this answer documented with me.Thanks @mjosh –  naveed ahmad May 29 at 7:31

I ran into the same problem, and here is how I fixed it:

private final class UIHandler extends Handler
{
    public static final int DISPLAY_UI_TOAST = 0;
    public static final int DISPLAY_UI_DIALOG = 1;

    public UIHandler(Looper looper)
    {
        super(looper);
    }

    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg)
    {
        switch(msg.what)
        {
        case UIHandler.DISPLAY_UI_TOAST:
        {
            Context context = getApplicationContext();
            Toast t = Toast.makeText(context, (String)msg.obj, Toast.LENGTH_LONG);
            t.show();
        }
        case UIHandler.DISPLAY_UI_DIALOG:
            //TBD
        default:
            break;
        }
    }
}

protected void handleUIRequest(String message)
{
    Message msg = uiHandler.obtainMessage(UIHandler.DISPLAY_UI_TOAST);
    msg.obj = message;
    uiHandler.sendMessage(msg);
}

To create the UIHandler, you'll need to perform the following:

    HandlerThread uiThread = new HandlerThread("UIHandler");
    uiThread.start();
    uiHandler = new UIHandler((HandlerThread) uiThread.getLooper());

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, i looked for this, your solution helped me. =) –  Dmitry Frank Jan 4 '12 at 6:06
    
i tried to use your code but i lost and not sure how to call from onCreate method or from AsyncTask in my situation will you please post the entire code just to learn how things work? –  Abu Hamzah Feb 29 '12 at 3:41
1  
Shouldn't that final line read uiHandler = new UIHandler(uiThread.getLooper()); ? –  Beer Me Sep 9 '13 at 16:42
2  
+1 for code that uses "super looper" –  Shaun Neal Sep 30 '13 at 0:55

Reason for an error:

Worker threads are meant for doing background tasks and you can't show anything on UI within a worker thread unless you call method like runOnUiThread. If you try to show anything on UI thread without calling runOnUiThread, there will be a java.lang.RuntimeException.

So, if you are in an activity but calling Toast.makeText() from worker thread, do this:

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() 
{
   public void run() 
   {
      Toast toast = Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Something", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();    
   }
}); 

The above code ensures that you are showing the Toast message in a UI thread since you are calling it inside runOnUiThread method. So no more java.lang.RuntimeException.

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Try this, when you see runtimeException due to Looper not prepared before handler.

Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()); 

handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
  @override
  void run() {
  // Run your task here
  }
}, 1000 );
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The answer by ChicoBird worked for me. The only change I made was in the creation of the UIHandler where I had to do

HandlerThread uiThread = new HandlerThread("UIHandler");

Eclipse refused to accept anything else. Makes sense I suppose.

Also the uiHandler is clearly a class global defined somewhere. I still don't claim to understand how Android is doing this and what is going on but I am glad it works. Now I will proceed to study it and see if I can understand what Android is doing and why one has to go through all these hoops and loops. Thanks for the help ChicoBird.

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