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When I try to compile this on Linux with gcc -std=c99, the compiler complains about not knowing struct timespec. However if I compile this without -std=c99 everything works fine.

#include <time.h>

int main(void)
{
  struct timespec asdf;
  return 0;
}

Why is this and is there a way to still get it to work with -std=c99?

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2 Answers 2

I would recommend compiling with -std=gnu99.

To elaborate on this. By default, gcc compiles with -std=gnu89. Here are the results for the following source code.

#include <time.h>

int main() {
    struct timespec asdf;
    return 0;
}

[1:25pm][wlynch@cardiff /tmp] gcc -std=gnu89 foo.c
[1:26pm][wlynch@cardiff /tmp] gcc -std=gnu99 foo.c

[1:25pm][wlynch@cardiff /tmp] gcc -std=c89 foo.c
foo.c: In function ‘main’:
foo.c:4: error: storage size of ‘asdf’ isn’t known

[1:26pm][wlynch@cardiff /tmp] gcc -std=c99 foo.c
foo.c: In function ‘main’:
foo.c:4: error: storage size of ‘asdf’ isn’t known
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1  
Not really an answer to the question –  Karel Petranek Oct 6 '10 at 17:23
3  
He's comparing -std=gnu89 to -std=c99. The more correct comparison would be -std=gnu89 to -std=gnu99. Although I do agree that Jonathan's answer explains what is going on here much better. –  sharth Oct 6 '10 at 17:27
8  
The downvotes on this answer are completely unwarranted. It makes it clear that the OP is comparing gnu89 with c99, which is why the error arises, and shows that the same error arises with c89. It is useful supplemental information. –  caf Oct 6 '10 at 21:50

The timespec comes from POSIX, so you have to 'enable' POSIX definitions:

#if __STDC_VERSION__ >= 199901L
#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 600
#else
#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 500
#endif /* __STDC_VERSION__ */

#include <time.h>

void blah(struct timespec asdf)
{
}

int main()
{
    struct timespec asdf;
    return 0;
}

The stanza at the top is what I currently use - it triggers the definitions from Single UNIX Specification (SUS) based on whether you're using a C99 or C89 compiler.

  • If you want the POSIX 2008 (SUS v4) material, use _XOPEN_SOURCE 700
  • If you want the POSIX 2004 (SUS v3) material, use _XOPEN_SOURCE 600
  • If you want the POSIX 1995 (SUS v2, 1997) material, use _XOPEN_SOURCE 500

For my systems, POSIX 2008 is not as widely available as 2004, so that's what I use - but YMMV. Note that SUS v3 and v4 both require C99 compilation. On Solaris, at least, using C89 will fail.

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1  
You should define _POSIX_C_SOURCE to the proper values if you just want POSIX. _XOPEN_SOURCE is for XSI extensions. –  R.. Oct 6 '10 at 18:42
1  
@R..: Yes, you are pedantically correct. However, in practice, do you really want only POSIX and not XSI? If so, you can read up and set just POSIX. For most people, most of the time, the solution given is sensible. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 6 '10 at 20:05
1  
In the latest SUS, pretty much all worthwhile functionality has been moved to base, and XSI is mostly legacy interface cruft. Of course I'm covering my back by saying "mostly". ;-) –  R.. Oct 6 '10 at 21:49
2  
_XOPEN_SOURCE does bring in some useful stuff compared to _POSIX_C_SOURCE, for example strdup(), strptime(), srandom(), realpath(), lockf(), and some large file support stuff. –  Mikel Apr 20 '11 at 0:22

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