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I would like a list of all new or modified records created after a specific date in all tables in a SQL Server database.

I am using SQL Server 2005 and ssms.

Is there a way to do this with one query, or some other tool?

How could I do this for one table?

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Someone smarter than me will confirm, but I think to get a RECORD level log of modified date/times, you need to maintain a field for it. Metadata only saves modified date/times for objects like tables/views/storedprocs. –  JNK Oct 6 '10 at 17:53
    
Does your table have a datetime column that stores the date of creation and last modification?? –  marc_s Oct 6 '10 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming all the tables have a ModifiedDate date column, you can then use the undocumented sp_msforeachtable proc

sp_msforeachtable 'select ''?'',count(*) 
   from ? where ModifiedDate > ''20100101'''

Just adjust the date range, I also use count(*) because I doubt you want millions of rows returned to you

If you don't have a column then you are out of luck, or if the column is named differently in every table then you need to use dynamic sql together with information_schema.columns and information_schema.tables to construct this query

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+1 for sp_msforerachtable. I use that a lot, with sp_msforeachdb to check all tables in all dbs on a server. –  JNK Oct 6 '10 at 18:01

There is nothing inherent in SQL Server where you can get that information. As @JNK indicated, you have to build that into your database design. And, you have to build the solution for each table by adding the create date as a column. Then, you can use SQL to capture the information.

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