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typedef struct node
{
    struct node *leftChild, *rightChild;
    int value;
} bst;

void insert(bst* b, int i)
{
                b=malloc(sizeof(b));
                b->value=i;
                b->leftChild = NULL;
                b->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]",b->value);
                return;
}
main()
{
  bst* b;
  insert(b,5);
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
}

The second printf causes a Segmentation Fault, commenting it out it works fine. What am I doing wrong here (Ignore the meanings of the function names i.e. that the insert is an insert function for the bst)? Shouldn't bst persist in it's setup outside of the insert function?

share|improve this question
    
Learn to use the debugger (gdb, for example or a visual one) and follow your variable b, stepping into the function call. That should give you your answer. –  Jason R. Mick Oct 6 '10 at 19:30
    
Note that the explicit "return;" is not needed as control will return to the caller at the end of the function regardless. Values need to be explicitly returned, though. You can also use explicit returns to exit early from a void function (or a function of any other type, for that matter). –  Martin Törnwall Oct 6 '10 at 19:42
    
The all the repliers, Thank you. You all contributed to helping me understand. I wish I could mark several of you as the answer. –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 21:48
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that b in main points to an invalid memory. The b doesn't get changed by insert because insert uses a copy of the pointer. You have to options to solve this:

  • Make "insert" take a pointer to pointer
  • Allocate the memory before entering "insert"

Because the first one is harder to read (and understand), I'd prefer the second one. But it depends on you what variant you choose.

Memory allocation before insert:

typedef struct node
{
    struct node *leftChild, *rightChild;
    int value;
} bst;

void insert(bst* b, int i)
{
                // No malloc here
                b->value=i;
                b->leftChild = NULL;
                b->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]",b->value);
                return;
}
main()
{
  bst* b = (bst *)malloc(sizeof(bst));  // This line has changed
  insert(b,5);
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
}

The variant with a double pointer:

typedef struct node
{
    struct node *leftChild, *rightChild;
    int value;
} bst;

void insert(bst** b, int i)
{
                *b = (bst *)malloc(sizeof(bst));  // This line has changed
                (*b)->value=i;
                (*b)->leftChild = NULL;
                (*b)->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]", (*b)->value);
                return;
}
main()
{
  bst* b;
  insert(&b,5);  // Now b is changed
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
}

Side note 1: you also have the malloc() incorrect - you should put use sizeof(bst) instead of sizeof(b) as the size. This is because sizeof(b) == sizeof(bst *) == size of an address, which is almost certainly not what you want.

Side note 2: do not forget to call free(b) at the end to avoid memory leaks.

Side note 3: check that malloc() doesn't return NULL. A rare case but a good program should expect that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the clear explanation. This makes sense. –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 19:50
    
One thing though (I cross commented this on shredds reply) - You said it makes a copy of the pointer. Isn't a pointer an address to another memory location? Shouldn't the copied pointer point to the same data? –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 20:25
1  
Not really, think of a pointer like of an int (it actually is an integer containing an index of a memory cell). If you have void foo(int i) { i = 0; } and call it: int myInt = 5; foo(myInt);, myInt will be 5. The same applies to a pointer: void foo(bst* i) { i = 0; } If you call it: bst* myPtr = smth; foo(myPtr);, myPtr will remain equal to smth. –  Karel Petranek Oct 6 '10 at 20:53
    
Seasoned C programmers should be able to use pointers-to-pointers intuitively, I'd advise the OP to start to get used to it. –  ninjalj Oct 6 '10 at 21:36
    
Thankyou this helped clear everything up. I appreciate it greatly. –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 21:49
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You need to pass the pointer by reference to change where it points.

// just add this & here in the function definition.
// That's the only change in all your code (for c++)
void insert(bst * &b, int i)

Or in C, a pointer pointer

void insert(bst ** b, int i)
{
                *b=malloc(sizeof(*b));
                (*b)->value=i;
                (*b)->leftChild = NULL;
                (*b)->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]",(*b)->value);
                return;
}

Note the changes to dereference the pointer pointer.

When you call this function, you'll need to take the address of your bst *:

insert(&b,5);
share|improve this answer
2  
That assumes he's using C++. Since he hasn't explicitly stated that it's the case, a more appropriate example would in my opinion use a pointer-to-pointer. –  Martin Törnwall Oct 6 '10 at 19:37
    
Passing in the argument using & before it goes to the function does work, but I do get warnings about a **. This makes sense since I am creating a pointer for a pointer, but I still don't understand why it works with a double pointer. Using the & of in the function prototype doesn't work for me. –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 19:39
    
@Martin Tornwall: Thanks for the suggestion, I added it in! :) –  JoshD Oct 6 '10 at 19:40
    
@JoshD: +1 for edit. –  Martin Törnwall Oct 6 '10 at 19:41
    
@Josh: My first suggestion with the & was for the function prototype. You want a pass-by-reference, calling should be the same. Is this c or c++? –  JoshD Oct 6 '10 at 19:41
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Since C does pass-by-value for arguments, the pointer being referenced inside insert() is a copy of the original b. The memory gets allocated to the variable b inside the function, but not to the variable in the main()function.

for eg.

# In main
b<main> = 0xOrigLoc
b<insert> = undefined

# In insert (before malloc)
b<main> = 0xOrigLoc
b<insert> = 0xOrigLoc

# After Malloc
b<main> = 0xOrigLoc
b<insert> = 0xNewLoc

Notice how b<main> remains untouched. You are only tweaking the copy of b inside the function.

The solution is to use a pointer to a pointer as described by the previous solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the notion of using a pointer was for this purpose. For example when I pass b to insert since it is typed as bst* doesn't that mean its a pointer to a bst object, and therefore when I pass it doesn't it pass a copy simply of the address pointing to b which still dereferences to b? –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 20:18
1  
yes, but you are then re-assigning this pointer to a new address when you do the malloc. The double pointer solution, will get you what you want, because it passes around a reference to the original b<main> (instead of a copy of it), which is then pointed at the malloced location. –  shreddd Oct 6 '10 at 21:12
    
You just blew my mind. Thank you. –  Joshua Enfield Oct 6 '10 at 21:46
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Rather than change the value, return the new value of b

bst* insert(bst* b, int i)
{
    if (b == NULL)
    {
        bst* result = (bst*)malloc(sizeof(bst));
        result->value=i;
        result->leftChild = NULL;
        result->rightChild = NULL;
        printf("[%i]",b->value);
        return result;
    }

    if (i < b->value)
        b->left  = insert(b->left, i);
    else
        b->right = insert(b->right, i);
    return b;
}

int main()
{
  bst* b  = NULL;   // Initialise it to empty.
  b       = insert(b,5);
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Well one problem is you're not typecasting your pointer.

The line:

b=malloc(sizeof(b));

Should be:

b=(bst*)malloc(sizeof(b));

Your code gives me an error when I compile it in gcc.


This is how to identify and fix errors in the future:

Testing in GDB:

Full code:

#include <malloc.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct node
{
    struct node *leftChild, *rightChild;
    int value;
} bst;

void insert(bst* b, int i)
{
  b=(bst*)malloc(sizeof(b));
                b->value=i;
                b->leftChild = NULL;
                b->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]",b->value);
                return;
}
main()
{
  bst* b;
  insert(b,5);
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
}

Compiled with

%g++ -g main.cc

Ran with

%gdb a.out

GDB commands:

b main.cc:211
run
print b
(output is: 0x0)
step
step
print b
(output is: 0x4f60010)
step
step
step
step
step
print b
(output is: 0x0)
quit

This clearly indicates that your variable is getting deallocated when the function leaves its scope.

Changing the code to:

#include <malloc.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct node
{
    struct node *leftChild, *rightChild;
    int value;
} bst;

void insert(bst* b, int i)
{
                b->value=i;
                b->leftChild = NULL;
                b->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]",b->value);
                return;
}
main()
{
  bst* b;
  b=(bst*)malloc(sizeof(bst));
  insert(b,5);
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
  free(b);
}

and rerunning gdb with the following commands:

b main.cc:21
run
s
(short for step)
print b
(output: 0x1aab010)
s
s
s
s
s
s
print b
(output: 0x1aab010)

Your problem is clearly the scope of the allocation. Moving the allocation to main fixes this.

Yay your program now works!

This should give you insight into how to use the debugger to solve these kinds of simple errors in the future.


Edit:

As one op pointed out, your underlying problem is that pointers passed to functions in c are treated as local objects, so when you exit the function, any allocated memory to single pointers is tossed in the bitbucket.

Double pointers allow you to actually allocate within functions, you just have to be careful to dereference them as necessary. So your working code could also be:

#include <malloc.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct node
{
    struct node *leftChild, *rightChild;
    int value;
} bst;

void insert(bst** b, int i)
{
                (*b)=(bst*)malloc(sizeof(bst));
                (*b)->value=i;
                (*b)->leftChild = NULL;
                (*b)->rightChild = NULL;
                printf("[%i]",(*b)->value);
                return;
}
main()
{
  bst* b;
  insert(&b,5);
  printf("[%i]",b->value);
  free(b);
}
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add comment

bst* b; declares a pointer... but doesn't allocate the actual structure. allocate and initialize b and you'll be onto your next step.

This is slightly a style discussion but your main should look either like this.

main()
{
  bst *b;
  b = (bst*)malloc(sizeof(bst));
  /* more initialization */
  insert(b, 5);

  free(b);
}

or like this

main()
{
  bst *b;
  bst_new(&b);
  insert(b, 5);
  bst_free(&b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
His insert function allocates the memory for it. –  JoshD Oct 6 '10 at 19:31
    
Yes, but it shouldn't... and allocating then initializing in main would have solved his problem and pointed him in the right direction –  Brian Makin Oct 6 '10 at 19:47
    
@Brain: what do you mean by "yes, but it shoudn't"? –  Donotalo Oct 6 '10 at 20:10
    
A c programmer isn't going to expect it to work that way. You should always allocate the free things at the same "level". If you want to do it in a function like that then you will also want to have a destroy function. Also the function should separate insertion. More commonly you would allocate along with the pointer declaration. –  Brian Makin Oct 6 '10 at 20:16
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