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Update: The example i originally had was kind of complex. Here's a simple 8 line example that explains everything in one code block. The following does not compile gives a warning:

TComputer = class(TObject)
public
    constructor Create(Cup: Integer); virtual;
end;

TCellPhone = class(TComputer)
public
    constructor Create(Cup: Integer; Teapot: string); virtual;
end;

Note: This question is part 3 in my ongoing series of questions about the subtlties of constructors in Delphi

Original question

How can i add a constructor to an existing class?

Let's give an hypothetical example (i.e. one that i'm typing up in here in the SO editor so it may or may not compile):

TXHTMLStream = class(TXMLStream)
public
   ...
end;

Further assume that the normal use of TXHTMLStream involved performing a lot of repeated code before it can be used:

var
   xs: TXHTMLStream;
begin
   xs := TXHTMLStream.Create(filename);
   xs.Encoding := UTF32;
   xs.XmlVersion := 1.1;
   xs.DocType := 'strict';
   xs.PreserveWhitespace := 'true';
   ...

   xs.Save(xhtmlDocument);

Assume that i want to create a constructor that simplifies all that boilerplate setup code:

TXHTMLStream = class(TXMLStream)
public
    constructor Create(filename: string; Encoding: TEncoding); virtual;
end;

constructor TXHTMLStream.Create(filename: string; Encoding: TEncoding);
begin
   inherited Create(filename);
   xs.Encoding := Encoding;
   xs.XmlVersion := 1.1;
   xs.DocType := 'strict';
   xs.PreserveWhitespace := True;
   ...
end;

That simplifies usage of the object to:

var
   xs: TXHTMLStream;
begin
   xs := TXHTMLStream.Create(filename, UTF32);
   xs.Save(xhtmlDocument);

Except now Delphi complains that my new constructor hides the old constructor.

Method 'Create' hides virtual method of base type 'TXMLStream'

i certainly didn't mean to hide the ancestor create - i want both.

How do i add a constructor (with a different signature) to a descendant class, while keeping the ancestor constructor so it can still be used?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

My immediate reaction is to use the overload keyword, as in:

TCellPhone = class(TComputer)
public
    constructor Create(Cup: Integer; Teapot: string); reintroduce; overload; virtual;
end;

Edit: Thanks Ian for the edit, which makes an answer out of my answer. I would like to think that I got it for bravery, so I am going to contribute a fuller example:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

type

TComputer = class(TObject)
public
    constructor Create(Cup: Integer); virtual;
end;

TCellPhone = class(TComputer)
public
    constructor Create(Cup: Integer; Teapot: string); reintroduce; overload; virtual;
end;

{ TComputer }

constructor TComputer.Create(Cup: Integer);
begin
  writeln('constructed computer: cup = ', Cup);
end;

{ TCellPhone }

constructor TCellPhone.Create(Cup: Integer; Teapot: string);
begin
  inherited Create(Cup);
  writeln('constructed cellphone: Teapot = ', Teapot);
end;

var
  C1, C2, C3: TComputer;

begin
  C1 := TComputer.Create(1);
  Writeln;
  C2 := TCellPhone.Create(2);
  Writeln;
  C3 := TCellPhone.Create(3, 'kettle');
  Readln;
end.

with the result being:

constructed computer: cup = 1

constructed computer: cup = 2

constructed computer: cup = 3
constructed cellphone: Teapot = kettle
share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is the right solution. –  Mason Wheeler Oct 6 '10 at 20:32
    
Nope: Method 'Create' hides virtual method of base type 'TComputer' –  Ian Boyd Oct 6 '10 at 20:34
    
Should be "reintroduce" as well - this will supress the hint –  Gerry Coll Oct 6 '10 at 20:37
    
@Gerry That does it. Which drives me nuts, because now reintroduce is used to not hide an ancestor method - when i was told 5 hours ago that it hides ancestor methods. (stackoverflow.com/questions/3874330/…) i have four questions going at once, and i keep going in circles. –  Ian Boyd Oct 6 '10 at 20:49
4  
Just to reinforce the earlier comments, reintroduce is exactly equivalent to a local form of suppress warning W1010. That's all it does. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Oct 6 '10 at 22:11

You could create two new overloaded constructors, for example:

type
  TXmlStream = class
  private
    FFileName: string;
  public
    constructor Create(const AFileName: string); virtual;
  end;

  TXhtmlStream = class(TXmlStream)
  private
    FEncoding: TEncoding;
  public
    constructor Create(const AFileName: string); overload; override;
    constructor Create(const AFileName: string; AEncoding: TEncoding); overload; virtual;
  end;

constructor TXmlStream.Create(const AFileName: string);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FFileName := AFileName;
end;

constructor TXhtmlStream.Create(const AFileName: string);
begin
  inherited Create(AFileName);
end;

constructor TXhtmlStream.Create(const AFileName: string; AEncoding: TEncoding);
begin
  inherited Create(AFileName);
  FEncoding := AEncoding;
end;
share|improve this answer

Another possibility is to write a new constructor with default parameter values where the part of the signature with non-default parameters matches the original constructor in the base class:

type
  TXmlStream = class
  private
    FFileName: string;
  public
    constructor Create(const AFileName: string); virtual;
  end;

  TXhtmlStream = class(TXmlStream)
  private
    FEncoding: TEncoding;
  public
    constructor Create(const AFileName: string; AEncoding: TEncoding = encDefault); reintroduce; virtual;
  end;

constructor TXmlStream.Create(const AFileName: string);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FFileName := AFileName;
end;

constructor TXhtmlStream.Create(const AFileName: string; AEncoding: TEncoding);
begin
  inherited Create(AFileName);
  FEncoding := AEncoding;
end;
share|improve this answer

Also remember that constructors don't HAVE to be called Create. Older versions of Delphi didn't have method overloading, so you had to use different names:

TComputer = class(TObject) 
public 
    constructor Create(Cup: Integer); virtual; 
end; 

TCellPhone = class(TComputer) 
private
  FTeapot: string;
public 
    constructor CreateWithTeapot(Cup: Integer; Teapot: string); virtual; 
end; 

...

constructor TCellPhone.CreateWithTeapot(Cup: Integer; Teapot: string); 
begin
  Create(Cup);
  FTeapot := Teapot;
end;

Both constructors will now be available.

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