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I prefer to use OOP in large scale projects like the one I'm working on right now. I need to create several classes in JavaScript but, if I'm not mistaken, there are at least a couple of ways to go about doing that. What would be the syntax and why would it be done in that way?

Or am I way off base here and there's only one way to define classes?

I would like to avoid using third-party libraries - at least at first.
Looking for other answers, I found the article Object-Oriented Programming with JavaScript, Part I: Inheritance - Doc JavaScript that discusses object-oriented programming in JavaScript. Is there a better way to do inheritance?

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Apr 10 '13 at 14:01

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
note: this is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/355848 –  Jason S Dec 23 '08 at 15:32
1  
Personally, I like declaring class members inside the function body. I use the 'fixing the this' technique to create closure to make it behave more like a class. I've got a detailed example on my blog: ncombo.wordpress.com/2012/12/30/… –  Jon Dec 30 '12 at 10:21
    
I ported most of C++ OOP functionality to JavaScript with a simple and natural syntax. See my answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/18239463/1115652 –  nus Aug 14 '13 at 18:54
    
There are no classes in JavaScript. But if you want to simulate class-alike behavior in JS, you can. See details in: symfony-world.blogspot.com/2013/10/… –  tkoomzaaskz Oct 23 '13 at 21:53
1  
i think we should reopen this question. –  Tambo Sep 28 at 7:55

13 Answers 13

up vote 435 down vote accepted

Here's the way to do it without using any external libraries:

// Define a class like this
function Person(name, gender){

   // Add object properties like this
   this.name = name;
   this.gender = gender;
}

// Add methods like this.  All Person objects will be able to invoke this
Person.prototype.speak = function(){
    alert("Howdy, my name is" + this.name);
};

// Instantiate new objects with 'new'
var person = new Person("Bob", "M");

// Invoke methods like this
person.speak(); // alerts "Howdy, my name is Bob"

Now the real answer is a whole lot more complex than that. For instance, there is no such thing as classes in JavaScript. JavaScript uses a prototype-based inheritance scheme.

In addition, there are numerous popular JavaScript libraries that have their own style of approximating class-like functionality in JavaScript. You'll want to check out at least Prototype and jQuery.

Deciding which of these is the "best" is a great way to start a holy war on Stack Overflow. If you're embarking on a larger JavaScript-heavy project, it's definitely worth learning a popular library and doing it their way. I'm a Prototype guy, but Stack Overflow seems to lean towards jQuery.

As far as there being only "one way to do it", without any dependencies on external libraries, the way I wrote is pretty much it.

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14  
But it doesn't work like X language where I learned the one true way that a thingy that is used to make object instances should work :( –  Erik Reppen Oct 16 '13 at 2:23
1  
Excellent, concise answer. –  bobobobo Jan 22 at 23:44
    
According to developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/… the properties should also be added to the prototype (" Person.prototype.name= ''; ") –  DaveD Mar 31 at 18:54
    
@DaveD - maybe it did, but doesn't seem to anymore..? –  Kieren Johnstone Jun 17 at 7:34
1  
Prototype is often overlooked for methods... Check out a big difference in performance. Prototyping object properties isn't as big of a deal, and harder to know when you should/shouldn't do it. jsperf.com/asdffafaal/2 –  BRogers Jun 23 at 19:01

The best way to define a class in JavaScript is to not define a class.

Seriously.

There are several different flavors of object-orientation, some of them are:

  • class-based OO (first introduced by Smalltalk)
  • prototype-based OO (first introduced by Self)
  • multimethod-based OO (first introduced by CommonLoops, I think)
  • predicate-based OO (no idea)

And probably others I don't know about.

JavaScript implements prototype-based OO. In prototype-based OO, new objects are created by copying other objects (instead of being instantiated from a class template) and methods live directly in objects instead of in classes. Inheritance is done via delegation: if an object doesn't have a method or property, it is looked up on its prototype(s) (i.e. the object it was cloned from), then the prototype's prototypes and so on.

In other words: there are no classes.

JavaScript actually has a nice tweak of that model: constructors. Not only can you create objects by copying existing ones, you can also construct them "out of thin air", so to speak. If you call a function with the new keyword, that function becomes a constructor and the this keyword will not point to the current object but instead to a newly created "empty" one. So, you can configure an object any way you like. In that way, JavaScript constructors can take on one of the roles of classes in traditional class-based OO: serving as a template or blueprint for new objects.

Now, JavaScript is a very powerful language, so it is quite easy to implement a class-based OO system within JavaScript if you want to. However, you should only do this if you really have a need for it and not just because that's the way Java does it.

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I prefer to use Daniel X. Moore's {SUPER: SYSTEM}. This is a discipline that provides benefits such as true instance variables, trait based inheritance, class hierarchies and configuration options. The example below illustrates the use of true instance variables, which I believe is the biggest advantage. If you don't need instance variables and are happy with only public or private variables then there are probably simpler systems.

function Person(I) {
  I = I || {};

  Object.reverseMerge(I, {
    name: "McLovin",
    age: 25,
    homeState: "Hawaii"
  });

  return {
    introduce: function() {
      return "Hi I'm " + I.name + " and I'm " + I.age;
    }
  };
}

var fogel = Person({
  age: "old enough"
});
fogel.introduce(); // "Hi I'm McLovin and I'm old enough"

Wow, that's not really very useful on it's own, but take a look at adding a subclass:

function Ninja(I) {
  I = I || {};

  Object.reverseMerge(I, {
    belt: "black"
  });

  // Ninja is a subclass of person
  return Object.extend(Person(I), {
    greetChallenger: function() {
      return "In all my " + I.age + " years as a ninja, I've never met a challenger as worthy as you...";
    }
  });
}

var resig = Ninja({name: "John Resig"});

resig.introduce(); // "Hi I'm John Resig and I'm 25"

Another advantage is the ability to have modules and trait based inheritance.

// The Bindable module
function Bindable() {

  var eventCallbacks = {};

  return {
    bind: function(event, callback) {
      eventCallbacks[event] = eventCallbacks[event] || [];

      eventCallbacks[event].push(callback);
    },

    trigger: function(event) {
      var callbacks = eventCallbacks[event];

      if(callbacks && callbacks.length) {
        var self = this;
        callbacks.forEach(function(callback) {
          callback(self);
        });
      }
    },
  };
}

An example of having the person class include the bindable module.

function Person(I) {
  I = I || {};

  Object.reverseMerge(I, {
    name: "McLovin",
    age: 25,
    homeState: "Hawaii"
  });

  var self = {
    introduce: function() {
      return "Hi I'm " + I.name + " and I'm " + I.age;
    }
  };

  // Including the Bindable module
  Object.extend(self, Bindable());

  return self;
}

var person = Person();
person.bind("eat", function() {
  alert(person.introduce() + " and I'm eating!");
});

person.trigger("eat"); // Blasts the alert!

Disclosure: I am Daniel X. Moore and this is my {SUPER: SYSTEM}. It is the best way to define a class in JavaScript.

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11  
+1 for using McLovin as an example name. –  srijan Sep 18 '12 at 16:52
    
"If you don't need instance variables and are happy with only public or private variables then there are probably simpler systems." - how does an instance variable differ from public and private variables? –  Casebash Jan 10 '13 at 4:30
2  
Instance variables are shared among individual instances of a class. In the example I.name is an instance variable. It is accessible from the child class as well as the parent. Private variable are variables defined in a closure, they cannot be shared among subclasses or mixins. Public variables are properties on the object itself. Any external code can modify them. The advantage of instance variables is that they can be shared among subclasses and mixins (unlike private variables) and you can control when and if they are exposed publicly (unlike public variables). –  Daniel X Moore Jan 10 '13 at 18:21
    
@DanielXMoore "Instance variables are shared among individual instances of a class" Those aren't instance variables, those are static/class variables. –  JAB Jul 2 '13 at 19:05
1  
@JAB That is incorrect, static/class variables are shared among all instances of a class. Each instance has its own instance variables. –  Daniel X Moore Jul 2 '13 at 19:34
var Animal = function(options) {
    var name = options.name;
    var animal = {};

    animal.getName = function() {
        return name;
    };

    var somePrivateMethod = function() {

    };

    return animal;
};

// usage
var cat = Animal({name: 'tiger'});
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This is a very elegant way to build a usable object structure without having to import anything. I was using Resig's class system, but I may like this better. Thank you. –  Tim Scollick Sep 3 '13 at 15:55
9  
The issue with this approach is that every time you create a new Animal instance it's going to redefine the functions rather than only defining them once with prototype. –  Justin Oct 14 '13 at 17:29
    
@Justin Is it really that bad though? I mean is the performance issue noticeable? I mean, angularJS uses this approach as well, so I would think it might be ok? I am having problems with inheritance in my NodeJS script and this looks like it could be the solution. Thanks liammclennan for pointing this out. –  Tom Feb 13 at 1:42

I think you should read Douglas Crockford's Prototypal Inheritance in JavaScript and Classical Inheritance in JavaScript.

Examples from his page:

Function.prototype.method = function (name, func) {
    this.prototype[name] = func;
    return this;
};

Effect? It will allow you to add methods in more elegant way:

function Parenizor(value) {
    this.setValue(value);
}

Parenizor.method('setValue', function (value) {
    this.value = value;
    return this;
});

I also recommend his videos: Advanced JavaScript.

You can find more videos on his page: http://javascript.crockford.com/ In John Reisig book you can find many examples from Douglas Crockfor's website.

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I actually watched that series and found it really interesting. I was very much interested, though, in getting a sampling of implementations from a variety of people. –  Karim Dec 23 '08 at 18:31
15  
Is it just me? How the heck is this more elegant? I would call function definitions with actual 'strings' as names many things, but elegant is not one of them... –  fgysin Jan 16 '13 at 12:28
1  
@fgysin I take it you haven't worked much with reflection, then. Accessing/assigning properties of objects using string names is a very powerful ability if you need dynamic binding or execution or the like. In fact, it's used extensively for runtime binding of event handlers (see developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/…). And here's an example of object[name] = func, from the jQuery source: github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/… –  JAB Jul 2 '13 at 19:03
1  
@JAB, but reflection is the exception, not the rule. With the above method, you have to declare all your methods with strings. –  Kirk Woll Dec 22 '13 at 17:05
    
@KirkWoll True enough, at least with Jarek's method. The "proper" way of dynamically/reflectively creating properties in JavaScript that can be accessed either as strings or with dot notation (assuming a valid identifier) is to use Object.defineProperty, which gives you lots of different options for how you want to declare a property (even more than with properties defined in object literals). You can even use this within functions assigned this way due to how JavaScript context works. –  JAB Dec 26 '13 at 17:38

Because I will not admit the YUI/Crockford factory plan and because I like to keep things self contained and extensible this is my variation:

function Person(params)
{
  this.name = params.name || defaultnamevalue;
  this.role = params.role || defaultrolevalue;

  if(typeof(this.speak)=='undefined') //guarantees one time prototyping
  {
    Person.prototype.speak = function() {/* do whatever */};
  }
}

var Robert = new Person({name:'Bob'});

where ideally the typeof test is on something like the first method prototyped

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I like it. I most often use JS's standard syntax cause I don't like the idea of copying functions into each object instance. I always missed the beauty of self contained solution though, and this solves it pretty well. –  Lukasz Korzybski Feb 3 '11 at 14:50
1  
What am I missing here? I fail to see how is this extensible. If I have main object called "Model" and then other object called "ItemModel" and I have function "save" in Model object which I want to overwrite in ItemModel, because there is something specific, this approach wouldn't work because of the one time prototyping. Hence not particularly extensible? –  Tom Feb 13 at 1:47
    
You can always define an arbitrarily named non-enumerable property for the one time proto check. At the end of proto definition, you do Object.defineProperty(Person, '_defined', {value: true}); and then simply check if Person._defined is true. Now you are free to override whatever method you wish in your extending objects. –  Robert Rossmann Jun 10 at 17:29
    
Not sure but I understood that defining prototype function inside the scope (somewhat as a closure) of a function results in a memory leak since the garbage collector can't come there in the instance of those classes. –  Sanne Jul 26 at 21:51

Following are the ways to create objects in javascript, which I've used so far

Example 1:

obj = new Object();
Obj.name = 'test';
obj.prototype.sayHello = function() {
    console.log('Hello '+ this.name);
}

Example 2:

obj = {};
obj.name = 'test';
obj.sayHello = function() {
    console.log('Hello '+ this.name);
 }
obj.sayHello();

Example 3:

var obj = function(nameParam) {
    this.name = nameParam;
}
obj.prototype.sayHello = function() {
    console.log('Hello '+ this.name);
}

Example 4: Actual benefits of Object.create(). please refer [this link]

var Obj = {
    init: function(nameParam) {
        this.name = nameParam;
    },
    sayHello: function() {
        console.log('Hello '+ this.name);
    }
};
var usrObj = Object.create(Obj);  // <== one level of inheritance

bob.init('Bob');
bob.sayHello();

Example 5 (customised Crockford's Object.create):

Object.build = function(o) {
   var initArgs = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments,1)
   function F() {
      if((typeof o.init === 'function') && initArgs.length) {
         o.init.apply(this,initArgs)
      }
   }
   F.prototype = o
   return new F()
}
MY_GLOBAL = {i: 1, nextId: function(){return this.i++}}  // For example

var userB = {
    init: function(nameParam) {
        this.id = MY_GLOBAL.nextId();
        this.name = nameParam;
    },
    sayHello: function() {
        console.log('Hello '+ this.name);
    }
};
var bob = Object.build(userB, 'Bob');  // Different from your code
bob.sayHello();
share|improve this answer
1  
Example 2 isn't valid JS. –  Justin Oct 14 '13 at 17:26

If you're going for simple, you can avoid the "new" keyword entirely and just use factory methods. I prefer this, sometimes, because I like using JSON to create objects.

function getSomeObj(var1, var2){
  var obj = {
     instancevar1: var1,
     instancevar2: var2,
     someMethod: function(param)
     {  
          //stuff; 
     }
  };
  return obj;
}

var myobj = getSomeObj("var1", "var2");
myobj.someMethod("bla");

I'm not sure what the performance hit is for large objects, though.

share|improve this answer
    
The obj.instancevar1 = var1 line isn't necessary, since the inner object will have access to getSomeObj()'s parameters. –  Triptych Dec 22 '08 at 23:28
    
Wow. That makes my brain hurt but there is a certain elegance to it. So the "obj.instancevar1 = var1" part is the beginning of a sort of constructor, i suppose? –  Karim Dec 22 '08 at 23:28
    
Just saw Triptych's comment. I see. So, you could just do something like "instancevar1: var1" where the inner object is being instantiated. –  Karim Dec 22 '08 at 23:29
    
Exactly... when you use {} to define an object, it has access to variables that are currently in scope. –  Sam Dec 22 '08 at 23:32
9  
With this approach you loose the ability to inherit, and since you aren't using obj.prototype.something you are defining the functions every time you are using the object = more memory and slower. –  some Dec 23 '08 at 4:10

The simple way is:

function Foo(a) {
  var that=this;

  function privateMethod() { .. }

  // public methods
  that.add = function(b) {
    return a + b;
  };
  that.avg = function(b) {
    return that.add(b) / 2; // calling another public method
  };
}

var x = new Foo(10);
alert(x.add(2)); // 12
alert(x.avg(20)); // 15

The reason for that is that this can be bound to something else if you give a method as an event handler, so you save the value during instantiation and use it later.

Edit: it's definitely not the best way, just a simple way. I'm waiting for good answers too!

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1  
The that=this construct is not necessary here. Also, the add() and avg() methods will be copied for every "instance" of class Foo, rather than shared between them. –  Triptych Dec 22 '08 at 23:36
1  
that=this is necessary if you want to use the method as an event handler directly (that.foo = function() { .. }; ... element.onclick = x.foo;). Methods copied for each instance allows private variables and functions that only they methods can see. –  orip Dec 23 '08 at 6:25
1  
Is it necessary (sorta) in that case, but not the simple case you've provided. –  Triptych Dec 23 '08 at 16:35

You probably want to create a type by using the Folding Pattern:

    // Here is the constructor section.
    var myType = function () {
        var N = {}, // Enclosed (private) members are here.
            X = this; // Exposed (public) members are here.

        (function ENCLOSED_FIELDS() {
            N.toggle = false;
            N.text = '';
        }());

        (function EXPOSED_FIELDS() {
            X.count = 0;
            X.numbers = [1, 2, 3];
        }());

        // The properties below have access to the enclosed fields.
        // Careful with functions exposed within the closure of the
        // constructor, each new instance will have it's own copy.
        (function EXPOSED_PROPERTIES_WITHIN_CONSTRUCTOR() {
            Object.defineProperty(X, 'toggle', {
                get: function () {
                    var before = N.toggle;
                    N.toggle = !N.toggle;
                    return before;
                }
            });

            Object.defineProperty(X, 'text', {
                get: function () {
                    return N.text;
                },
                set: function (value) {
                    N.text = value;
                }
            });
        }());
    };

    // Here is the prototype section.
    (function PROTOTYPE() {
        var P = myType.prototype;

        (function EXPOSED_PROPERTIES_WITHIN_PROTOTYPE() {
            Object.defineProperty(P, 'numberLength', {
                get: function () {
                    return this.numbers.length;
                }
            });
        }());

        (function EXPOSED_METHODS() {
            P.incrementNumbersByCount = function () {
                var i;
                for (i = 0; i < this.numbers.length; i++) {
                    this.numbers[i] += this.count;
                }
            };
            P.tweak = function () {
                if (this.toggle) {
                    this.count++;
                }
                this.text = 'tweaked';
            };
        }());
    }());

That code will give you a type called myType. It will have internal private fields called toggle and text. It will also have these exposed members: the fields count and numbers; the properties toggle, text and numberLength; the methods incrementNumbersByCount and tweak.

The Folding Pattern is fully detailed here: Javascript Folding Pattern

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MooTools (My Object Oriented Tools) is centered on the idea of classes. You can even extend and implement with inheritance.

When mastered, it makes for ridiculously reusable, powerful javascript.

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If you haven't settled on a JavaScript library yet, and if you are looking for sanity in your life, make sure to check out Ext JS in your exploration.

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I'm actually using YUI right now for a variety of reasons but it's not clear to me if they provide some wrapper for defining classes in javascript. –  Karim Dec 23 '08 at 0:02
1  
I had a really poor experience with ExtJS... it's an incredibly big (not necessarily bloated) library that would hang my browser for 2 seconds on every page load. –  nickf Dec 23 '08 at 0:25
    
Little late... @nickf - ExtJS is just as fast or slow as other libraries, You may be running into firebug slowness or bringing in everything in the library that you may not need. @Karim - they do, and there is an extend() and override() API call to provide inheritance. –  Mike Jan 5 '09 at 3:11

JavaScript is object-oriented, but it's radically different than other OOP languages like Java, C# or C++. Don't try to understand it like that. Throw that old knowledge out and start anew. JavaScript needs a different thinking.

I'd suggest to get a good manual or something on the subject. I myself found ExtJS Tutorials the best for me, although I haven't used the framework before or after reading it. But it does give a good explanation about what is what in JavaScript world. Sorry, it seems that that content has been removed. Here's a link to archive.org copy instead. Works today. :P

share|improve this answer
    
Not an answer for the above asked question. And even your link is not working.. sencha.com/learn/legacy/Tutorial:What_is_that_Scope_all_about. It says "The page you’re trying to reach could not be found." Requested to please update, provide answer for the question. –  Amol M Kulkarni Mar 4 '13 at 6:17
    
@AmolMKulkarni - There you go. :) –  Vilx- Mar 4 '13 at 10:28
    
Object-oriented? I thought it was functional. –  Peter Mortensen Aug 3 '13 at 6:28
    
The "ExtJS Tutorials" link is broken. –  Peter Mortensen Aug 3 '13 at 6:28
    
@PeterMortensen - It's multi-paradigm, really. There's functional, imperative, object-oriented, and probably some others that I don't know about. Also - read thoroughly. There's an archive.org copy of that tutorial. –  Vilx- Aug 4 '13 at 18:52

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