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In python, I can do the following:

keys = [1, 2, 3]
values = ['a', 'b', 'c']
d = dict(zip(keys, values))

assert d == {1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c'}

Is there a nice way to construct a map in groovy, starting from a list of keys and a list of values?

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try this:

def keys = [1, 2, 3]
def values = ['a', 'b', 'c']
def pairs = [keys, values].transpose()

def map = [:]
pairs.each{ k, v -> map[k] = v }
println map

Alternatively:

def map = [:]
pairs.each{ map << (it as MapEntry) }
share|improve this answer
1  
Very nice, it looks like transpose() is equivalent to python's zip(). Now if only there was a Map constructor for a list of pairs. [:].putAll(pairs.collect{ new MapEntry(it[0], it[1]) }) works as a one-liner, but is uglier than I'd like. – ataylor Oct 7 '10 at 3:53
    
@ataylor See my updated post for another way to use MapEntry – NullUserException Oct 7 '10 at 4:00
3  
[keys,values].transpose().inject([:]) { map, it -> map << ( it as MapEntry ) } – tim_yates Oct 7 '10 at 6:06

There's also the collectEntries function in Groovy 1.8 (currently in beta)

def keys = [1, 2, 3]
def values = ['a', 'b', 'c']
[keys,values].transpose().collectEntries { it }
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. Looking forward to 1.8 even more now. – ataylor Oct 7 '10 at 16:55
5  
You can even leave out the identity closure: [keys,values].transpose().collectEntries() – Maxy-B Aug 21 '13 at 18:59
    
@Maxy-B yeah, since 1.8.5 :-) – tim_yates Aug 21 '13 at 19:02

There isn't anything built directly in to groovy, but there are a number of ways to solve it easily, here's one:

def zip(keys, values) {
    keys.inject([:]) { m, k -> m[k] = values[m.size()]; m } 
}

def result = zip([1, 2, 3], ['a', 'b', 'c'])
assert result == [1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c']
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