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I'm coding in C# for the .NET Framework 3.5.

I am trying to parse some Json to a JObject.

The Json is as follows:

{
    "TBox": {
        "Name": "SmallBox",
        "Length": 1,
        "Width": 1,
        "Height": 2 },
    "TBox": {
        "Name": "MedBox",
        "Length": 5,
        "Width": 10,
        "Height": 10 },
    "TBox": {
        "Name": "LargeBox",
        "Length": 20,
        "Width": 20,
        "Height": 10 }
}

When I try to parse this Json to a JObject, the JObject only knows about LargeBox. The information for SmallBox and MedBox is lost. Obviously this is because it is interpreting "TBox" as a property, and that property is being overwritten.

I am receiving this Json from a service that's coded in Delphi. I'm trying to create a C# proxy for that service. On the Delphi-side of things, the "TBox" is understood as the type of the object being returned. The inner properties ("Name", "Length", "Width", "Height") are then understood as regular properties.

I can serialize and deserialize a custom 'TBox' object that has Name, Length, Width, and Height properties. That's fine.

What I want to do is step through all the TBox sections in such a way as to extract the following three Json strings.

First:

{
    "Name": "SmallBox",
    "Length": 1,
    "Width": 1,
    "Height": 2 }

Second:

{
    "Name": "MedBox"
    "Length": 5,
    "Width": 10,
    "Height": 10 }

Third:

{
    "Name": "LargeBox"
    "Length": 20,
    "Width": 20,
    "Height": 10 }

Once I have these strings, I can serialize and deserialize to my heart's content.

I'm finding Newtonsoft.Json to be very good. I really don't want to go messing about with other frameworks if I can avoid it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I have very limited input as to changes that can be made to the server.

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq;

JsonTextReader jsonReader = new JsonTextReader(reader);
jsonReader.Read();
while(jsonReader.Read())
{
    if(jsonReader.TokenType == JsonToken.StartObject)
    {
        JObject tbox = JObject.Load(jsonReader);
    }
}

However, note that the RFC says, "The names within an object SHOULD be unique" so if you can, recommend the format be changed.

EDIT: Here's an alternate design that doesn't have duplicate keys:

[
    {
        "TBox": {
            "Width": 1,
            "Length": 1,
            "Name": "SmallBox",
            "Height": 2
        }
    },
    {
        "TBox": {
            "Width": 10,
            "Length": 5,
            "Name": "MedBox",
            "Height": 10
        }
    },
    {
        "TBox": {
            "Width": 20,
            "Length": 20,
            "Name": "LargeBox",
            "Height": 10
        }
    }
]
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2  
@Ubiquitous, I never said it violated the RFC. But it is unintuitive, and I don't necessarily agree this is a reason to break it. There are other designs that provide the type information without duplicate keys. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 7 '10 at 0:12
1  
In this case I would interpret the SHOULD as a direction to JSON-parser-developers that they shouldn't throw an error when they encounter duplicate names. However, since the JS in JSON stands for "JavaScript" and JavaScript data structures CANNOT have duplicate names, it seems clear to me that your Delphi guys are violating the spirit, if not the letter, of the spec. The Newtonsoft behavior is exactly correct, because it's the same thing a JavaScript parser would do. –  Joel Mueller Oct 7 '10 at 0:18
4  
An object in JSON is a name/value collection and this JSON is misusing the name. Json.NET's JObject in this example is doing exactly what a browser would do when provided with duplicate properties: uses the last value. The best solution is to change the JSON to either have a wrapper object with a property for the type name and a property for the value or add the type as a special property on the value object. –  James Newton-King Oct 7 '10 at 1:05
3  
Calm - I'm giving my opinion trying to help, not criticize you. Anyways, a user in this case is the developer. Developers are use to working with JSON objects that are name/value collections. The JSON home page - json.org - defines them as just that: a name/value collection. Again, you aren't breaking the spec but you are breaking user (developer) expectations. If you have a good reason to structure the JSON like you have then that is fine, just be aware that by doing something non-standard the consequence could be more questions for help like this one by the consumers of the JSON. –  James Newton-King Oct 7 '10 at 10:04
2  
Wow. I guess you showed me with that "END. FINAL." thing. Good for you. I suppose that json.org saying that Javascript parses the JSON text is just a figure of speech. if (language=="JavaScript") parser = false? I suppose that JavaScript not throwing errors when duplicate names are encountered doesn't invalidate your statement about parsers, because JavaScript never parses anything. Good job of redefinition there. I bow before the master. However, if you want to shut people up to disagree with you, you forgot an important phrase: END. FINAL. TIMES INFINITY. fingers in ears Lalala.... –  Shawn Grigson Nov 18 '10 at 14:35
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If I'm not mistaken, the correct answer to this is that your input is not actually JSON. So no, getting a JSON parser to parse it probably isn't going to work.

Maybe you don't have any control over the source of the input, so I'd use a Regex or something to pre-filter the string. Turn it into something like:

{"TBoxes":
    [
        {
            "Name": "SmallBox",
            "Length": 1,
            "Width": 1,
            "Height": 2 
        },
        {
            "Name": "MedBox",
            "Length": 5,
            "Width": 10,
            "Height": 10 
        },
        {
            "Name": "LargeBox",
            "Length": 20,
            "Width": 20,
            "Height": 10 
        }
    ]
}

And treat it like the array that it is.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a go at Regex, and it was proving difficult. In some of the real-world scenarios I'm going to have to handle objects within objects within objects. I tried it out just to be sure, and handling the nested curly-braces and the possible character sets quickly became a pain in the ass. I'm normally a huge fan of regex, but in this case I was hoping for something easier. –  Ubiquitous Che Oct 6 '10 at 23:37
    
Turns out that they are technically still sending valid Json. See my second comment to Matthew above. It's annoying on my end, but I can handle it now. –  Ubiquitous Che Oct 7 '10 at 0:02
1  
You are mistaken - it is correct JSON. –  Deltics Oct 7 '10 at 0:59
2  
No, it's really not correct JSON. You're misinterpreting the spec, which is "based on a subset of the JavaScript Programming Language, Standard ECMA-262 3rd Edition - December 1999." There are no JavaScript parsers that will retain any but the very last value associated with multiple duplicate keys. Go ahead and tell Douglas Crockford, the inventor of JSON, that he's wrong. –  Joel Mueller Oct 7 '10 at 16:14
    
@Joel: Wrong. There are at least TWO. The one I wrote and the one provided by Newtonsoft. Just because many parsers make the same invalid assumptions you do does not mean they are wrong. They correctly implement the spec. You don't have to like it, but persisting in the view that something that complies with the specification is wrong is just plain stupid. What you get when run "execute" the JS in a JSON object is not relevant to the question of what is a correct JSON structure, especially if the JSON structure is not intended to be executed as JS and is merely a data transport. End. –  Deltics Oct 7 '10 at 19:39
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