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I was wondering if there was a way to multiply BigInteger variables together, because the * operator cannot be applied to BigInteger.

So I was wondering if it was possible to multiply two BigIntegers together without using the * operator.

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Operators only work on objects if it can go through autoboxing. The only ones that can do that are the class representations for the primitive types (int -> Integer). –  user1181445 Jul 29 '13 at 1:12
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

You use BigIntegers multiply() method like so:

BigInteger int1 = new BigInteger("131224324234234234234313");
BigInteger int2 = new BigInteger("13345663456346435648234313");
BigInteger result =  int1.multiply(int2) 

I should have pointed out a while ago that BigInteger is immutable. So any result of an operation has to be stored into a variable. The operator or operand are never changed.

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If this gets too annoying, you can do work in Groovy which maps the operators correctly. I am implementing some math classes (BigRational for one) and for the first time Java has seemed extremely cumbersome--Although I generally love Java I have to admit that it's not the answer to every programming problem. If you need Java's speed but want advantages like Operator Overloading you might also try Scala. –  Bill K Oct 7 '10 at 0:05
    
In the last snippet line, isn't just "int2" is sufficient as argument passed to multiply? It's a BigInteger after all. –  amar Jul 27 '13 at 19:49
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@amar Thanks for pointing that out. I'm not sure what I was thinking. Probably a copy-paste error. –  jjnguy Jul 29 '13 at 0:42
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You can use the multiply(BigInteger) method in BigInteger. So:

BigInteger result = someBigInt.multiply(anotherBigInt);

BigInteger in Java API

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