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I am getting a "string cannot be resolved to a type" error in my code.

public class Main {


 public static void main(String[] args) {
  // TODO Auto-generated method stub
  FormLetter template;
  template = new FormLetter();
  template.print();
  template.composeFormLetter(Sean, Colbert, God);
  template.print();

 }

}

class FormLetter
 {
  public void print(){
    System.out.println(to + candidate + from);

  }  

  public void composeFormLetter(string t, string c, string f){

   to = t;
   candidate = c; 
   from = f;
  } 
   private string to;
   private string candidate;
   private string from;

  }
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2  
For future reference, be sure to post the entire compiler error message in your question if present, to make it easier to pinpoint what's wrong. –  In silico Oct 7 '10 at 0:16
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

String is capitalized in Java. You cannot use lowercase string. (That's C#)

Side question:
How is the following compiling at all?

template.composeFormLetter(Sean, Colbert, God);
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Ok, I corrected the string issue. template.composeFormLetter(Sean, Colbert, God); is leaving an error: Multiple markers at this line - God cannot be resolved - Colbert cannot be resolved - Sean cannot be resolved –  chief Oct 7 '10 at 0:27
1  
@chief - String literals are supposed to have double quotes around them. (Side answer - it is not ...) –  Stephen C Oct 7 '10 at 0:29
    
@chief, "God", "Sean", "Colbert" You need to put Strings inside of quotation marks. –  jjnguy Oct 7 '10 at 0:31
    
@Stephen, hahaha. –  jjnguy Oct 7 '10 at 0:33
    
Alright in the console it returns: nullnullnull and then god colbert sean. –  chief Oct 7 '10 at 0:34
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