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I'm using MSVC and it seems like the code below does not crash and the function pointer is initialized to NULL by the compiler.

int (*operate)(int a, int b);
int add(int a, int b)
{
    return a + b;
}

int subtract(int a, int b)
{
    return a - b;
}

int main()
{


    if(operate) //would crash here if not NULL
    {
        cout << operate(5,5);
    }

    operate = add;
    if(operate)
    {
        cout << operate(5,5);
    }

    operate = subtract;
    if(operate)
    {
        cout << operate(5,5);
    }
    return 0;
}

So it seems MSVC initializes function pointers to NULL, but if I build this on gcc in Linux would it also be NULL? Is it conventional or MSVC specific, can I rely on it being NULL wherever I go?

Thanks

share|improve this question
4  
Make the pointer a local variable and you'll see that it won't. You have an uninitialized global and the compiler will usually put that in the .bss segment which is zero-initialized. – Jeff Mercado Oct 7 '10 at 0:30
4  
C or C++, they're different languages. – GManNickG Oct 7 '10 at 0:39
2  
@Jeff: where the compiler puts it is irrelevant. It's required to be zero-initialized if it has static storage duration. – R.. Oct 7 '10 at 0:50
1  
Compare with Will a function pointer be NULL by default? (which is not a duplicate, but is relevant and shows that Milo needs to work a little more on his question titles). – dmckee Oct 7 '10 at 0:59
1  
@Jeff: Of course the standard requires it, and has for 20-some years. This is one of the most basic things any C programmer should know. – R.. Oct 7 '10 at 1:04
up vote 17 down vote accepted

operate is initialised to NULL because it is a global variable, not because it is a function pointer. All objects with static storage duration (which includes global variables, file-level static variables and static variables in functions) are initialised to 0 or NULL if no initialiser is given.

[EDIT in response to Jim Buck's comment:] In C++, this is guaranteed by clause 3.6.2/1 of the language standard, which begins:

Objects with static storage duration (3.7.1) shall be zero-initialized (8.5) before any other initialization takes place. Zero-initialization and initialization with a constant expression are collectively called static initialization; all other initialization is dynamic initialization.

I expect the same behaviour is true of C, since C++ is designed to be compatible with it on most things, although I don't have the standard for it.

[EDIT #2] As Jeff M points out in a comment, it's important to realise that variables of automatic storage duration (that is, "ordinary" local variables) are not automatically zero-initialised: unless an initialiser is given, or they are assigned values by a constructor, they will initially contain random garbage (whatever was already sitting in memory at that location). So it's a good habit to initialise all variables -- it can't hurt but can help.

share|improve this answer
6  
@Jim: Indeed they are so guaranteed in C++. I will add a reference to the relevant paragraph from the standard to my post. – j_random_hacker Oct 7 '10 at 0:35
4  
@Jeff: whether or not the compiler chooses to put them in the .bss segment, they must be initially zero. This is required by both the C and C++ language standards. – R.. Oct 7 '10 at 0:49
6  
The C99 spec section 6.9.2 covers this -- its the same as C++ – Chris Dodd Oct 7 '10 at 1:04
1  
@Matt: Not sure how you came away with the impression that I was suggesting things are different for C. I was just saying I was not certain it was the same. Dunno how I could have been much clearer about that...? – j_random_hacker Oct 7 '10 at 1:17
1  
@Jim: I can see why that stuck in your memory :) C++ compilers have been notorious for implementing the language spec incorrectly -- my guess is a compiler or linker bug caused you that grief. Don't know if that makes it better or worse... :) – j_random_hacker Oct 7 '10 at 3:05

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