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Is anybody familiar with Worldviz-Vizard's 3D engine for python? How does it compare to Panda3D? I have a feeling that it might be easier to learn but far more limited. They only support python 2.4 which also makes me not want to try it.

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Good god, look at those prices! I haven't heard of Worldviz before now, so won't formally answer. I endorse Panda3D wholeheartedly. – Russell Borogove Oct 7 '10 at 1:14
    
That is exactly what made me come and ask. Either these guys have something awesome to charge almost 10,000 or they are crazy. – relima Oct 7 '10 at 1:23
    
There are a few different options for licensing. The full dev one is expensive, but not unreasonable and it's not your only option. – Stephen Nov 8 '10 at 8:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've never heard of Worldviz Vizard or Panda3D but it seems to me like you would have to reinvent the wheel to use Pygame for 3D.

Another Option:Unity. I'm not terribly experienced with this either but I heard it's good.

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Been using Vizard for various VR and AR development for about 3 yrs now - it's NOT unity - i.e. a web enabled game engine (excellent though it is) - what Vizard provides is a highly optimized OpenGL engine, wrapped in user friendly python scripting environment BUT on top of this you get the ability to seamlessly distribute your simulations over a cluster or a network. Vizard keeps all things completely synched - invisible to the user. Connects to pretty much all known VR tracking equipment and display periphals and standard gaming equipment is also supported (Wiimote & Kinnect). Native support for frame sequential, side-by-side and anaglyph stereo, spatial sound engine and the ability to extend it with C and C++ plugins or GLSL shaders.

Didn't actually mean to write that much and I don't want to come across as a Vizard evangelist, it is not perfect, BUT comparing it to Panda3D, Unity or other game engines I feel is an unfair comparison - not like-for-like :o)

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I only used Vizard, and that for one small project.

It was easy to use, well documented, and had a good set of examples.

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