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How do we explain the result of the expression (++x)+(++x)+(++x)?

int i=2;
i = ++i + ++i + ++i;

Which is more correct? Java's result of 12 or C = 13. Or if not a matter of correctness, please elaborate. Thank you.

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13  
That's odd; when I compile it in C my compiler dances like an undefined chicken. –  Strilanc Oct 7 '10 at 6:27
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why -1 ? Is this not a valid question? Anyhow @Strilanc, what compiler are you using? –  Manny Oct 7 '10 at 6:28
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If you really see that in your code, I think it's better to refactor that!! –  romaintaz Oct 7 '10 at 6:37
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Duplicate of How do we explain the result of the expression (++x)+(++x)+(++x)? Why are these questions asked so often? –  dalle Oct 7 '10 at 6:53
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@dalle - not really, different languages will handle this differently. –  Kobi Oct 7 '10 at 6:56
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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There is nothing like more correct. It is actually undefined and its called Sequence Point Error. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequence_point

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1  
Thank you, I'm enlightened by the term Sequence Point Error. –  Manny Oct 7 '10 at 6:30
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+1, very nice . –  JoshD Oct 7 '10 at 6:33
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It's well-defined in Java. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 7 '10 at 6:40
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Java guarantees (§15.7.1) that it will be evaluated left-to-right, giving 12. Specifically, ++ has higher precedence that +. So it first binds those, then it associates the addition operations left to right

i = (((++i) + (++i)) + (++i));

§15.7.1 says the left operand is evaluated first, and §15.7.2 says both operands are evaluated before the operation. So it evaluates like:

i = (((++i) + (++i)) + (++i));
i = ((3 + (++i)) + (++i)); // i = 3;
i = ((3 + 4) + (++i)); // i = 4;
i = (7 + (++i)); // i = 4;
i = (7 + 5); // i = 5;
i = 12;

In C, it is undefined behavior to modify a variable twice without a sequence point in between.

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A small question - is left-to-right really needed here? In this example, can another order give a different result? I suppose it's more relevant to statements like i = (i*=2) + (i*=3) + (i*=4);, where order matters. –  Kobi Oct 7 '10 at 6:53
    
Thanks, @Potatoswatter. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 7 '10 at 6:53
    
@Kobi, not really, but I hope explaining simpler cases helps people work up to more complex ones. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 7 '10 at 7:01
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Change it to ++i - ++i - ++i and left-to-right order becomes very important. –  Paul McGuire Oct 7 '10 at 7:11
    
Shouldn't the step after ((3 + 4) + (++i)) be ((3 + 4) + 5)? Since ++ has higher precedence than +? –  configurator Oct 17 '10 at 23:17
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The Java result makes sense to me because the operators give the result you would expect, but no serious program should contain a statement like this.

EDIT: I'm amused that this one sentence response has been my highest scored answer of the evening (compared to the dozen other answers I posted, some with pages of code samples). Such is life.

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In C this is undefined behavior. There is no correct.

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