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I've got a Javascript mess that looks something like:

Note: Not working code, just trying to illustrate my problem...

$(function() {
    $(foo).Something( {  //Something is a grid control
       buttons: {
            add: {
                onClick: function() { //Build dialog box to add stuff to grid
                    $('<div></div>')
                    .html('...')
                    .dialog({
                        buttons: {
                            done: { //Finished button on dialog box
                                OnClick: function() {
                                    $(this).dialog('close');
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    });
                }
            }
       } 
    } );
});

I'd like to replace some of the function(){...}s with real functions, to clean things up a bit and to get rid of all that indenting. How do I assign a real function to one of the callbacks rather than an anonymous function?

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
function abc(){
  return false;
}
var callback = {click : abc}

You can then use callback.click.call or callback.click.apply

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Note that this approach only works if abc does not accept any parameter. –  nico Oct 7 '10 at 7:06
1  
Oops.. I did functionname() (note the extra ()s). :sigh: That's what I get for working on this at 3 AM. –  Billy ONeal Oct 7 '10 at 7:07
    
Nope. You can pass arguments into abc by passing it to apply. To call as abc(a, b) use callback.click.apply(this, [a, b]); developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  Joyce Babu Oct 7 '10 at 7:08
    
Both this answer and Ignacio's answer are correct. Checking this one because it has a code example. –  Billy ONeal Oct 7 '10 at 7:19
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Give the function name instead of function(){ ... }.

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Oops.. I did functionname() (note the extra ()s). :sigh: That's what I get for working on this at 3 AM. –  Billy ONeal Oct 7 '10 at 7:06
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+1 because of the awesome indentation example.

You can define named functions as Joyce stated; you can also considerably clean up that deeply nested code by just declaring some variables (function or not) and spreading the code into multiple, non-nested statements.

The dialog creation would be my first candidate for that type of refactoring (and it demonstrates uses a named function):

function CreateDialog() { //Build dialog box to add stuff to grid
                    $('<div></div>')
                    .html('...')
                    .dialog({
                        buttons: {
                            done: { //Finished button on dialog box
                                OnClick: function() {
                                    $(this).dialog('close');
                                }
                            }
                        }


$(function() {
    $(foo).Something( {  //Something is a grid control
       buttons: {
            add: {
                onClick: CreateDialog
                }
            }
       } 
    } );
});

I should also note that you can initialize most jQuery objects (looks like you are using jQueryUI) after they are created. For example, you don't have to configure the buttons all in one shot: http://jqueryui.com/demos/dialog/#option-buttons

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OK then, here goes my answer:

Oops.. You did functionname() (note the extra ()s). :sigh: That's what you get for working on this at 3 AM.

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