Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm using jquery to call some javascript functions with a delay between them.
Also I'm using Jquery Wait

When I call below function,all functions are called recpectively,there are no delays between each other.

$(this)
.call(f1)
.wait(5000)
.call(f2)
.wait(5000)
.call(f3);

Here call function calls some function as I did

$.fn.call = function (f) {
    if (f)
        f();

    return this;
};

What am i doing wrong ? How can i achieve something like this ?
Thank you

share|improve this question
    
What, exactly, isn't working here? –  Samir Talwar Oct 7 '10 at 8:10
    
functions are called one by one,there are no delays between them –  Myra Oct 7 '10 at 8:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to call a function every 5 seconds use

setTimeout(function(){f1},5000);
setTimeout(function(){f2},10000);
setTimeout(function(){f2},15000);

if you want to call each function 5 seconds after the last one terminated use

setTimeout(function(){f1;setTimeout(function(){f2;setTimeout(function(){f3},5000);},5000);},5000);
share|improve this answer
    
setTimeout() will call each function once. To call a function repeatedly, use setInterval(). –  Dijkstra Oct 7 '10 at 8:17
    
is there a way to achieve this in jquery ? i mean like i did –  Myra Oct 7 '10 at 8:18
    
why do you need jQuery? jQuery is just a javascript framework and will work with this –  Thariama Oct 7 '10 at 8:32
    
I know what jquery is.For later use,I will have animations work with this code,that's why i should stick with jquery.Your implementation is also correct +1 –  Myra Oct 7 '10 at 11:00

You don't need wait() from that cookbook; delay() is built-in and appears to have the same functionality. But either function involves adding something to jQuery's internal queue of effects and then removing it after a timeout expires, i.e. it's not a sleep statement, so it's not going to wait around before returning.

If you want to use delay() or wait(), you should make call() enqueue the function with queue(). Just sketching, but something like:

$.fn.call = function(f) {
    if (f) {
        $(this).queue(function() {
            f();
            $(this).dequeue();
        }
    }
    return this;
}

Then I'd expect your code to work the way you intend.

share|improve this answer
    
your code is not working properly :( –  Myra Oct 7 '10 at 10:58
    
Well, it was just a sketch to get you in the right direction, insofar as using wait/delay is concerned. I haven't actually tried it, so it might take some tweaking. Look carefully at the documentation for queue(), and try some of their examples. –  user24359 Oct 7 '10 at 21:56

Here is a function that calls in sequence an array of function:

$.fn.callFn = function(fns, delay) {
    var fn, that = this;
    if(fns.length > 0){
        fn = fns.shift()
        fn && fn();
        setTimeout(function(){
            that.callFn(fns, delay);
        }, delay);
    }
    return this;
};

And you would call it like that:

$(this).callFn([f1, f2, f3], 2000);
share|improve this answer
    
I will have animations work with my code($(this) .call(f1).wait(5000).call(f2).wait(5000).animate(...).wait(1000).call(f3);),that‌​'s why i should stick with jquery. –  Myra Oct 7 '10 at 13:25
$('#box').slideUp(300).delay(800).fadeIn(400);

/* .delay = wait time = 800 (this means it will wait 800/1000 of a second/ "1000 = 1 second") */
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.