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I know how to get a list of DIVs of the same css class e.g

<div class="class1">1</div>
<div class="class1">2</div>

using xpath //div[@class='class1']

But how if a div have multiple classes, e.g

<div class="class1 class2">1</div>

What will the xpath like then?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The expression you're looking for is:

//div[contains(@class, 'class1') and contains(@class, 'class2')]

I highly suggest XPath visualizer, which can help you debug xpath expressions easily. It can be found here:

http://xpathvisualizer.codeplex.com/

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Minor problem with this solution is that it'll potentially break if a possible class name is a substring of another. For example, if you also have 'class11', it'll erroneously match this, as it contains 'class1'. This is very easy to avoid though, just make sure class names don't contain each other. –  Flynn1179 Aug 1 '12 at 8:36
    
Agreed, but given what 's being discussed here involves scanning an attribute's string value, in XPath speak, I 'm not sure if it can be avoided. –  Ioannis Karadimas Aug 1 '12 at 8:39
1  
Well, if it was really necessary you could do contains(concat(' ', @class, ' '), ' class1 ') etc., but as I said, it's very easy to avoid the need for that. –  Flynn1179 Aug 1 '12 at 10:48

Found this blog posts, hope they're useful.

Select HTML elements with more than one css class using XPath

XPath for CSS classes

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Thanks. But seems this doesn't work. rootNode.SelectNodes("//div[(@class='class1') and (@class='class2')]"); returns null –  seasong Oct 7 '10 at 11:27
    
Yes, sorry I changed that a few minutes ago. Those blog posts deal with the exact problem you're having. –  gcores Oct 7 '10 at 11:28

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