Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a following templated struct:

template<int Degree>
struct CPowerOfTen {
enum { Value = 10 * CPowerOfTen<Degree - 1>::Value };
};

template<>
struct CPowerOfTen<0> {
    enum { Value = 1 };
};

which is to be used like this:

const int NumberOfDecimalDigits = 5;
const int MaxRepresentableValue = CPowerOfTen<NumberOfDecimalDigits>::Value - 1;
// now can use both constants safely - they're surely in sync

now that template requires Degree to be non-negative. I'd like to enforce a compile-time assert for that.

How do I do that? I tried to add a destructor to CPowerOfTen:

~CPowerOfTen() {
    compileTimeAssert( Degree >= 0 );
 }

but since it is not called directly Visual C++ 9 decides not to instantiate it and so the compile-time assert statement is not evaluated at all.

How could I enforce a compile-time check for Degree being non-negative?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted
template<bool> struct StaticCheck;
template<> struct StaticCheck<true> {};

template<int Degree> 
struct CPowerOfTen : StaticCheck<(Degree > 0)> { 
    enum { Value = 10 * CPowerOfTen<Degree - 1>::Value }; 
}; 

template<> 
struct CPowerOfTen<0> { 
    enum { Value = 1 }; 
}; 

Edit: without infinite recursion.

// Help struct
template<bool, int> struct CPowerOfTenHelp;

// positive case    
template<int Degree> 
struct CPowerOfTenHelp<true, Degree> { 
    enum { Value = 10 * CPowerOfTenHelp<true, Degree - 1>::Value }; 
}; 

template<> 
struct CPowerOfTenHelp<true, 0> { 
    enum { Value = 1 }; 
}; 

// negative case
template<int Degree> 
struct CPowerOfTenHelp<false, Degree> {}

// Main struct
template<int Degree> 
struct CPowerOfTen : CPowerOfTenHelp<(Degree >= 0), Degree> {};
share|improve this answer
    
Not stopping the compile-time recursion is a big problem, though? –  visitor Oct 7 '10 at 12:11

You can use a uint. You won't get a compile time error but at least it will be self-documenting.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. Non-negative numbers are only one failure. What about CPowerOfTen<10000>? This should not work anyway. –  harper Oct 7 '10 at 11:52
    
NEVER use uint to enforce that a value be nonnegative. In this case, should -1 be passed, it will be converted to some gigantic value and passed as a template argument, your compiler will hang, and you won't know what to do. Fortunately, the upcoming C++0x provides static assert with a custom message to report in case of assertion failure –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 8 '10 at 10:49

You can use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT macro. Or implement your own, the simplest way of forcing a failure is performing a typedef of an array of N elements, where N is positive/negative depending on the argument.

The problem with that approach is that it will produce a failure, but will try to perform the recursion nonetheless. Take a look at boost::enable_if_c to use SFINAE to fail instantiating the template if the argument is negative.

share|improve this answer

You can forward the implementation to a class also accepting a bool parameter indicating whether the result can be calculated.

#include <limits>
template <int Degree, bool InRange>
struct PowerOfTenImpl
{
    enum {Value = 10 * PowerOfTenImpl<Degree - 1, InRange>::Value};
};

template <>
struct PowerOfTenImpl<0, true>
{
    enum {Value = 1};
};

template <int Degree>
struct PowerOfTenImpl<Degree, false>
{
};

template<int Degree>
struct CPowerOfTen {
    enum { Value = PowerOfTenImpl<Degree, Degree >= 0 && 
      Degree <= std::numeric_limits<int>::digits10>::Value };
};

int main()
{
    const int a = CPowerOfTen<4>::Value;
    const int b = CPowerOfTen<1000>::Value;
    const int c = CPowerOfTen<-4>::Value;
}
share|improve this answer

How about implementing a STATIC_CHECK macro?

template<bool> struct CompileTimeError;
template<> struct CompileTimeError<true> {}; //specialized only for true

#define STATIC_CHECK(expr)  (CompileTimeError<(expr) != 0>())

Inside main()

 const int NumberOfDecimalDigits = -1;
 STATIC_CHECK(NumberOfDecimalDigits > 0); // Error : invalid use of incomplete type struct CompileTimeError<false>

 const int MaxRepresentableValue = CPowerOfTen<NumberOfDecimalDigits>::Value - 1; 
share|improve this answer
    
The drawback of this solution is that the check is separate from the struct. –  sharptooth Oct 7 '10 at 13:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.