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for(x;x<crap;x++){
    macro(x,y);
}

how is this handled by preprocessor? is the loop unrolled or something else?

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The macro is expanded before the code is compiled - it doesn't matter whether it's in a loop or anywhere else.

#define macro(x, y) doSomething(x, y)
for(x;x<crap;x++){
    macro(x,y);
}

will expand to:

for(x;x<crap;x++){
    doSomething(x,y);
}

The context surrounding macro(x,y) has no effect on how the preprocessor expands it.

(The preprocessor doesn't even know what programming language you're using - it could be C, Python, Brainfuck or a letter to your bank manager and it would expand macros just the same way.)

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The preprocessor does have to know what language is being used. Before macro replacement, the source has to be decomposed into preprocessing tokens, which are defined by the C and C++ language standards and are in some cases different between the two languages. During evaluation of conditional directives, whether true and false are handled as boolean values is language-dependent (they are in C++ but they are not in C). There are many other subtleties. –  James McNellis Oct 9 '10 at 18:27
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#define macros can be thought of as a search and replace before compilation action happens. This means whatever your macro equates to will be directly substituded in its reference inside your code. No, the loop is no unrolled.

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