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I have a div 200 x 200 px. I want to place a 50 x 50 px right in the middle of the div.

How can it be done?

I am able to get it centered horizontally by using text-align: center for the div. But vertical alignment is the issue..

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23 Answers 23

up vote 178 down vote accepted

Personally, I'd place it as the background image within the div, the CSS for that being:

#demo
{
background:url(bg_apple_little.gif) no-repeat center center;
height:200px;
width:200px;
}

(Assumes a div with id="demo" as you are already specifying height and width adding a background shouldn't be an issue)

Let the browser take the strain...

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1  
I like the idea here... =) –  Jronny Aug 5 '10 at 2:52
2  
nice answer. very clean. –  Andrew Rollings Jun 13 '11 at 23:34
2  
This is usually the best answer, unless the size of the image can vary from smaller to bigger than the container's size. In the 'smaller' case, it will be fine, but in the 'bigger' case, your image will be clipped. –  leandre_b Jul 11 '11 at 15:52
42  
Not as SEO/reader friendly if you want to add an ALT attribute. –  edgi Aug 27 '11 at 2:35
1  
What about if we are using a sprite? I am trying to center the background image, but I'm using a CSS sprite. Any ideas? –  Nathan Nov 23 '11 at 3:43

You could do some fancy tricks...

img{
    position: absolute;
    margin: auto;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
this indeed centers img in the middle of the page, but not in the middle of the 200px x 200px div. –  Jevgeni Bogatyrjov Sep 18 '12 at 7:47
9  
just make the div relative #someDiv { position: relative } –  Pavel Nikolov Dec 5 '12 at 15:12
    
works well in all browsers the accepted doesn't work for IE < 9 –  ndrizza Dec 29 '12 at 21:10
4  
Worked like a charm. This should have been the accepted answer. –  Abhishek Deb Mar 20 at 12:04
1  
You can also center exclusively horizontal by omitting the top and bottom, and center exclusively vertical by omitting the right and left. –  manuelhe Jul 31 at 15:16

another way is to create a table with valign, of course. This would work regardless of you knowing the div's height or not.

<div>
   <table width="100%" height="100%" align="center" valign="center">
   <tr><td>
      <img src="foo.jpg" alt="foo" />
   </td></tr>
   </table>
</div>

but you should always stick to just css whenever possible.

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28  
I knew that this would get me down-voted. I thought about listing this just for the sake of completeness, but, oh well. –  andyk Dec 23 '08 at 14:09
26  
Don't you know that using tables causes blindness? –  Pekka 웃 Dec 28 '09 at 18:23
15  
CSS when possible, but this is definitely a useful fallback. Don't forget why we stopped using tables in the first place. Use whatever is the most flexible solution. Sometimes this is it. –  Russell Leggett Mar 24 '10 at 14:49
12  
Note: This may have been "acceptable" in 2008, but in 2012, this is never, ever acceptable. –  animuson Jan 19 '12 at 19:58
26  
Objection, animuson: All the other solutions here assume that you know the image size as they appear in the browser, which is not the case if you design a responsive layout where your image is "height:100%" and it's container is "width:25%", leaving you with an x or y margin of unknown size. –  iHaveacomputer Jul 18 '12 at 3:09

I would set your larger div with position:relative; then for your image do this:

img.classname{
   position:absolute;
   top:50%;
   left:50%;
   margin-top:-25px;
   margin-left:-25px;
}

This only works because you know the dimensions of both the image and the containing div. This will also let you have other items within the containing div... where solutions like using line-height will not.

EDIT: Note... your margins are negative half of the size of the image.

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1  
very nice idea.. –  Amol M Kulkarni Feb 22 '13 at 8:00
1  
I used this, but removed margin bits and adding -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%); -moz-transform: translateY(-50%); -ms-transform: translateY(-50%); transform: translateY(-50%);. Gives more generic solution that does need element size. –  Jon Sep 13 '13 at 21:24

This is coming a bit late, but here's a solution I use to vertical align elements within a parent div.

This is useful for when you know the size of the container div, but not that of the contained image. (this is frequently the case when working with lightboxes or image carousels).

Here's the styling you should try:

 container div
 {
   display:table-cell;
   vertical-align:middle;

   height:200px;
   width:200px;
 }

 img
 {
   /*Apply any styling here*/        
 }
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1  
+1 for showing me a away to make a CSS div behave like a table cell, now I can avoid further countless hours of frustration getting CSS to do what is simple to do with a traditional HTML table cell –  Kmeixner Mar 17 '13 at 15:25
1  
add in text-align:center; to container div and it's centered both directions if you're applying a max height/width to an unknown sized image. –  Steve-O-Rama Jul 2 '13 at 23:53

This works correctly:

display: block;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto 
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3  
should be the one of the top answer. –  oak Feb 7 at 13:56

I've found that Valamas' and Lepu's answers above are the most straightforward answers that deal with images of unknown size, or of known size that you'd rather not hard-code into your CSS. I just have a few small tweaks: remove irrelevant styles, size it to 200px to match the question, and add max-height/max-width to handle images that may be too large.

div.image-thumbnail
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    line-height: 200px;
    text-align: center;
}
div.image-thumbnail img
{
    vertical-align: middle;
    max-height: 200px;
    max-width: 200px;
}
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This works a treat, thanks! –  brian sharon Mar 27 '12 at 16:51
    
The only solution that worked on WebView on Samsung Galaxy S4 for my particular problem. –  peceps Feb 18 at 9:46

Typically, I'll set the line-height to be 200px. Usually does the trick.

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Vertical-align is one of the most misused css styles. It doesn't work how you might expect on elements that are not td's or css "display: table-cell".

This is a very good post on the matter. http://phrogz.net/CSS/vertical-align/index.html

The most common methods to acheive what you're looking for are:

  • padding top/bottom
  • position absolute
  • line-height
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I have a gallery of images for which I don't know the exact heights or widths of images beforhand, I just know that they are smaller than the div in which they are going to be contained.

By doing a combination of line-height settings on the container and using vertical-align:middle on the image element, I finally got it to work on FF 3.5, Safari 4.0 and IE7.0 using the following HTML markup and the following CSS.

The HTML Markup

<div id="gallery">
    <div class="painting">
        <a href="Painting/Details/2">
            <img src="/Content/Images/Paintings/Thumbnail/painting_00002.jpg" />
        </a>
    </div>
    <div class="painting">
        ...
    </div>
    ...
 </div>

The CSS

div.painting
{
    float:left;

    height:138px; /* fixed dimensions */
    width: 138px;

    border: solid 1px white;
    background-color:#F5F5F5;


    line-height:138px;    
    text-align:center;

}

    div.painting a img
    {
        border:none;
        vertical-align:middle;

    }
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In CSS do it as:

img
{

  display:table-cell;
  vertical-align:middle;
  margin:auto;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Thats only make it horizontal center. If you provide auto for top and bottom margin, browsers take it as zero by default. –  knoxxs May 30 '12 at 7:52
3  
Doesn't work - jsfiddle.net/dandv/umBRF, though the reason is not the margin-top/bottom as knoxxs suggests. For the image to display as a table-cell, it needs a parent element to have display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; - jsfiddle.net/dandv/umBRF/1 –  Dan Dascalescu Sep 4 '12 at 4:54
    
Close, but the display and vertical-align properties need to be applied to the container, not the thing being centered. (See Kshitij Chopra's answer) –  Faust Jul 1 '13 at 8:44

This works for me :

<body>
  <table id="table-foo">
    <tr><td>
        <img src="foo.png" /> 
    </td></tr>
  </table>
</body>
<style type="text/css">
  html, body {
    height: 100%;
  }
  #table-foo {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
  }
  #table-foo img {
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
  }
</style>
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here's another method to center everything within anything.

Working Fiddle

HTML: (simple as ever)

<div class="Container">
    <div class="Content"> /*this can be an img, span, or everything else*/
        I'm the Content
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.Container
{
    text-align: center;
}

    .Container:before
    {
        content: '';
        height: 100%;
        display: inline-block;
        vertical-align: middle;
    }

.Content
{
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

Benefits

The Container and Content height are unknown.

Centering without specific negative margin, without setting the line-height (so it works well with multiple line of text) and without a script, also Works great with CSS transitions.

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+1. Great solution and very good SO answer. I'm wondering what's causing the browser to do the (expected) behaviour only by adding the before pseudoclass with content: "" (Because many of us might have tried display: inline-block and vertical-align: middle without success). –  try-catch-finally Mar 29 at 19:17
1  
it's actually very simple. you create an empty element inside the container that spans 100% height, and then you align your element with the center of this empty one. causing your element to be in the exact center of the container. –  avrahamcool Mar 29 at 20:31
    
I needed this within a gallery grid, and this solution worked better than any of the other solutions. +1. –  Mateng Sep 18 at 5:51

in the div

style="text-align:center; line-height:200px"
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But this doesnt seem to work if the div just contains the image (FF3). code: <div style="border: 1px solid #ccc; margin: 20px; height: 200px; width: 200px;"> <img src="sun.gif" /> </div> Am I missing anything? –  sleepy Dec 23 '08 at 6:21
    
This does not really do what the question asked and is only supposed to work for text (and only centers the aimage/text vertically) The accepted answer is the most apropriate solution afaik. –  Roland Tepp Sep 28 '09 at 12:29

If you like a jQuery based solution: http://andreaslagerkvist.com/jquery/center/

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That link appears to only support centering elements in the viewport or document, not in their parent. –  Carl G Jun 29 '12 at 22:25

You can center an image horizontally and vertically with the code below (works in IE/FF). It will put the top edge of the image at exactly 50% of the browser height, and the margin-top(pulling half the height of the image up) will center it perfectly.

<style type="text/css">
    #middle {position: absolute; top: 50%;} /* for explorer only*/
    #middle[id] {vertical-align: middle; width: 100%;}
         #inner {position: relative; top: -50%} /* for explorer only */
</style>


<body style="background-color:#eeeeee">
    <div id="middle">
        <div id="inner" align="center" style="margin-top:...px"> /* the number will be half the height of your image, so for example if the height is 500px then you will put 250px for the margin-top */
            <img src="..." height="..." width="..." />
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
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This is an old solution but browser market shares have advanced enough that you may be able to get by without the IE hack part of it if you are not concerned about degrading for IE7. This works when you know the dimensions of the outer container but may or may not know the dimensions of the inner image.

 <div style="display: table; height: 200px; width:200px;">
     <div style="display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;margin:0 auto;">
         <img src="foo.png" alt="bar" />
     </div>
 </div>
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I just do this:

.image_container_div {
    height: 320px;
    width: 350px;
    vertical-align: middle;
    display: table-cell;
    margin: auto;
    text-align: center;
}
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thanks to everyone else for the clues.

I used this method

div.image-thumbnail
{
    width: 85px;
    height: 85px;
    line-height: 85px;
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: center;
}
div.image-thumbnail img
{
    vertical-align: middle;
}
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The answer from bochgoch, using the div's background did it for me. You can simply solve SEO/reader friendly issues by placing a transparent image with alt gtag in the div and use the title tag in the link.

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This worked for me. Add this to image css:

img
{
   display: block;
   margin: auto;
}
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works only for horizontal centering. –  avrahamcool Oct 6 '13 at 7:53

If you know the size of the parent div and the image, you can just use absolute positioning.

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I had this issue in HTML5 using CSS3 and my image was centered as such within the DIV... oh yes, I can't forget how I had to add the height to show the image... for a while I wondered where it was until I did this. I don't think the position and display are necessary.

background-image: url('../Images/01.png');    
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-position:center;
position:relative;
display:block;
height:60px;
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