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I'm totally new to Android.

I would like to put in a textbox where user can enter an IP address ... but how do I limit the user to only enter numbers? ... and how do I validate?

Is there a ready-made-ip-address-textbox "out there" I can use?

Thanks!

Mojo

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For validation, regular-expressions.info has a good regex string you could use for testing for an IP in a valid (0-255) range:

\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?).(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?).(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?).(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b

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Yeah I was hoping for some kind of masked textbox, but regex is a good solution - thanks! –  MojoDK Oct 8 '10 at 22:27
    
Yeah, you could probably extend a custom textbox, but I wouldn't even know where to start with that. Good luck! –  kcoppock Oct 8 '10 at 23:00

What I've found that works is to set an EditText to use android:inputType="phone", so the input is restricted to digits, period, and a handful of other characters. However, this will only let you input IPV4 addresses, since it's digits only. For validation, you'll have to get the input text and parse it by hand.

As far as ready-made input widgets, I haven't come across one.

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Great idea ... thanks!!! –  MojoDK Oct 8 '10 at 22:27

You can use :

EditText ipAddress = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.ip_address);
InputFilter[] filters = new InputFilter[1];
    filters[0] = new InputFilter() {
        @Override
        public CharSequence filter(CharSequence source, int start, int end,
                android.text.Spanned dest, int dstart, int dend) {
            if (end > start) {
                String destTxt = dest.toString();
                String resultingTxt = destTxt.substring(0, dstart) + source.subSequence(start, end) + destTxt.substring(dend);
                if (!resultingTxt.matches ("^\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3})?)?)?)?)?)?")) { 
                    return "";
                } else {
                    String[] splits = resultingTxt.split("\\.");
                    for (int i=0; i<splits.length; i++) {
                        if (Integer.valueOf(splits[i]) > 255) {
                            return "";
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            return null;
        }

    };
    ipAddress.setFilters(filters);
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In addition to what Erich said, you can use android:digits="0123456789." to disallow anything but digits and a decimal point.

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Necro! This is, I think, the most complete of the existing solutions to this (at least that I've found). The only improvement I can imagine is to implement a new KeyListener to restrain the input better... but I'm not convinced it is practically possible, given how IMEs work with layouts and stuff.

public class IPAddressText extends EditText {

public IPAddressText(Context context) {
    super(context);

    setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_PHONE);
    setFilters(new InputFilter[] { new InputFilter() {
        @Override
        public CharSequence filter(CharSequence source, int start, int end, android.text.Spanned dest, int dstart, int dend) {
            if (end > start) {
                String destTxt = dest.toString();
                String resultingTxt = destTxt.substring(0, dstart) + source.subSequence(start, end) + destTxt.substring(dend);
                if (!resultingTxt.matches("^\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3})?)?)?)?)?)?")) {
                    return "";
                } else {
                    String[] splits = resultingTxt.split("\\.");
                    for (int i = 0; i < splits.length; i++) {
                        if (Integer.valueOf(splits[i]) > 255) {
                            return "";
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            return null;
        }
    }
    });

    addTextChangedListener(new TextWatcher() {
        boolean deleting = false;
        int lastCount = 0;

        @Override
        public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {
            if (!deleting) {
                String working = s.toString();
                String[] split = working.split("\\.");
                String string = split[split.length - 1];
                if (string.length() == 3 || string.equalsIgnoreCase("0")
                        || (string.length() == 2 && Character.getNumericValue(string.charAt(0)) > 1)) {
                    s.append('.');
                    return;
                }
            } 
        }

        @Override
        public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {
            if (lastCount < count) {
                deleting = false;
            } else {
                deleting = true;
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {
            // Nothing happens here
        }
    });
}

}

And because it is what I actually ended up using, here is an EditTextPreference version...

public class IPAddressPreference extends EditTextPreference {

public IPAddressPreference(Context context) {
    super(context);

    getEditText().setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_PHONE);
    getEditText().setFilters(new InputFilter[] { new InputFilter() {
        @Override
        public CharSequence filter(CharSequence source, int start, int end, android.text.Spanned dest, int dstart, int dend) {
            if (end > start) {
                String destTxt = dest.toString();
                String resultingTxt = destTxt.substring(0, dstart) + source.subSequence(start, end) + destTxt.substring(dend);
                if (!resultingTxt.matches("^\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3}(\\.(\\d{1,3})?)?)?)?)?)?")) {
                    return "";
                } else {
                    String[] splits = resultingTxt.split("\\.");
                    for (int i = 0; i < splits.length; i++) {
                        if (Integer.valueOf(splits[i]) > 255) {
                            return "";
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            return null;
        }
    }
    });

    getEditText().addTextChangedListener(new TextWatcher() {
        boolean deleting = false;
        int lastCount = 0;

        @Override
        public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {
            if (!deleting) {
                String working = s.toString();
                String[] split = working.split("\\.");
                String string = split[split.length - 1];
                if (string.length() == 3 || string.equalsIgnoreCase("0")
                        || (string.length() == 2 && Character.getNumericValue(string.charAt(0)) > 1)) {                     
                    s.append('.');
                    return;
                }
            } 
        }

        @Override
        public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {
            if (lastCount < count) {
                deleting = false;
            } else {
                deleting = true;
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {
            // Nothing happens here
        }
    });
}

}

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1  
Usefull, but your "afterTextChanged" method is not so good. I removed the "string.equalsIgnoreCase("0")" and change the "Character.getNumericValue(string.charAt(0)) > 1)" to "Integer.parseInt(string) > 25)" –  RaphMclee Dec 18 '13 at 15:45

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