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I've found some strange behaviour in python regarding negative numbers:

>>> a = -5
>>> a % 4
3

Could anyone explain what's going on?

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6  
looks right to me –  wheaties Oct 7 '10 at 15:04
3  
..., -9, -5, -1, 3, 7, ... –  NullUserException Oct 7 '10 at 15:19
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4 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Unlike C or C++, Python's modulo operator (%) always return a number having the same sign as the denominator (divisor). Your expression yields 3 because

(-5) % 4 = (-2 × 4 + 3) % 4 = 3.

It is chosen over the C behavior because a nonnegative result is often more useful. An example is to compute week days. If today is Tuesday (day #2), what is the week day N days before? In Python we can compute with

return (2 - N) % 7

but in C, if N ≥ 3, we get a negative number which is an invalid number, and we need to manually fix it up by adding 7:

int result = (2 - N) % 7;
return result < 0 ? result + 7 : result;

(See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operator for how the sign of result is determined for different languages.)

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1  
Shouldn't that be (-2 * 4 + 3) ? –  Vatine Oct 7 '10 at 15:08
    
@Vatine: Fixed thanks. (Was thinking about 5 ^^) –  KennyTM Oct 7 '10 at 15:09
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Here's an explanation from Guido van Rossum:

http://python-history.blogspot.com/2010/08/why-pythons-integer-division-floors.html

Essentially, it's so that a/b = q with remainder r preserves the relationships b*q + r = a and 0 <= r < b.

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There is no one best way to handle integer division and mods with negative numbers. It would be nice if a/b was the same magnitude and opposite sign of (-a)/b. It would be nice if a % b was indeed a modulo b. Since we really want a == (a/b)*b + a%b, the first two are incompatible.

Which one to keep is a difficult question, and there are arguments for both sides. C and C++ round integer division towards zero (so a/b == -((-a)/b)), and apparently Python doesn't.

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Modulo, equivalence classes for 4:

  • 0: 0, 4, 8, 12... and -4, -8, -12...
  • 1: 1, 5, 9, 13... and -3, -7, -11...
  • 2: 2, 6, 10... and -2, -6, -10...
  • 3: 3, 7, 11... and -1, -5, -9...

Here's a link to modulo's behavior with negative numbers. (Yes, I googled it)

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@NullUserException - yup, it was. fixed. Thanks. –  wheaties Oct 7 '10 at 15:35
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