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This is really basic, but I can't figure out why it keeps resetting the creation date. I'm using a simple expiration cache on the object. If it is expired, then I will create a new object. If it isn't, then just use the one that exists. However, every time I go to check the creation date on the object, it is the current date.

public class MyObjectImpl implements MyObjectInterface {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = -3542728718515350246L; // auto generated from Eclipse...

    public MyObjectImpl() {
        this.creationDate = new Date().getTime();
    }

    public boolean hasExpired(BigInteger millesecondsToExpiration) {
        if (millesecondsToExpiration == null) {
            millesecondsToExpiration = new BigInteger("2592000000"); // 30 Days
        }
        if (getCreationDate() + millesecondsToExpiration.longValue() < new Date().getTime()) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }

    private Long creationDate;

    public Long getCreationDate() {
        return this.creationDate;
    }
}

Here is how I call it:

MyObjectInterface myObject = (MyObjectInterface)session.getAttribute("MY_OBJECT");

if (myObject == null || (myObject != null && myObject.hasExpired(null))) {
    session.setAttribute("MY_OBJECT", new myObjectImpl());
}
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Please show the code that illustrates the "wrong" date. How are you getting the instance of MyObjectImpl to compare against? –  Kirk Woll Oct 7 '10 at 16:32
    
You can see the code that illustrates the call now. Thanks. –  Brian Reindel Oct 7 '10 at 16:41
    
Why are you using a BigInteger when it must always be converted to a 'long' for the comparison? It leaves the possibility of unexpected results if a larger-than-long value is used as a parameter to your method. –  Jim Tough Oct 7 '10 at 17:06
1  
You should work on your coding: Use long instead of Long. Use a long constant instead of new BigInteger(??), e.g. 1000L * 60L * 60L * 24L * 30L. Return the result of a boolean expression directly, return b; instead of if (b) { return true; } else { return false; }. Use a hasExpired method without parameters for the default case. –  starblue Oct 7 '10 at 17:29
    
And use System.currentTimeMillis. –  starblue Oct 7 '10 at 17:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

hasExpired returns true for young objects, it is the wrong way around:

if (getCreationDate() + millesecondsToExpiration.longValue() < new Date().getTime()) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }

So you recreate the object each time.

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I think the simplest answer is that your constructor is getting called, and you don't think it is. Have you tried logging in the constructor?

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